Dancing All the Way Home

The Bulareyaung Dance Company
:::

2020 / November

Chen Chun-fang /photos courtesy of Kent Chuang /tr. by Phil Newell


The following words appeared on the Facebook page of the Bulareyaung Dance Company, in the Paiwan language: “Returning home is a con­tinu­ation of a complete life, so Bulareyaung is opening the door.” This marked the opening of a rehearsal space following choreographer Bulareyaung Pagarlava’s return to Taitung to pursue his dreams. Since then five years have flashed by, during which time Bula­reyaung, hand in hand with young indigenous people, has transformed the inspiration he takes from the land into a succession of brilliant choreographic works, inviting the general public to join in exploring the beauty of dance and indigenous culture.


Paiwan choreographer Bulareyaung Pagarlava has created works for Cloud Gate Dance Theater and the Martha Graham Dance Company, and is highly esteemed in inter­national dance circles. However, just as his choreographic career was at its peak, he chose to return to his hometown of Taitung to form the Bula­reyaung Dance Company (BDC). Since leaving home at age 15 to study dance in the city, until age 40 Bula­reyaung was a work­aholic. When he decided to return to Taitung, friends bet that he wouldn’t last three months, but he has now been there for over five years.

Who am I?

Meeting Bulareyaung face to face, his eloquent conversation and frequent bursts of hearty laughter make it hard to imagine that in the past he was very serious and unsociable around other people.

“In the past I always did my creative work alone behind closed doors, but since returning home I’ve become more relaxed.” Bulareyaung says that all this goes back to his exploring the question “Who am I?” The conventions of city life were a straitjacket that made him reserved and inhibited. But after setting foot in his native place and working with young indigenous people, he has gradually rediscovered his optimistic and carefree nature.

The members of BDC, who come from various indigenous tribes and had no previous formal training in dance, have played a key role in all this.

When Bulareyaung first returned to Taitung, he followed his usual approach to choreography, asking members of the company to share their imaginative thoughts about the sea, and then to individually interpret these thoughts in dance. Ten minutes passed, then half an hour, but nobody could give him a response. After several attempts, the dancers said to him frankly: “Teacher, don’t tell us to use our imaginations any more. Take us out to do some labor, or go into the mountains.” Someone even joked: “Don’t use your Taipei brain to work with us—you’ll never get what you want.” The troupe members’ straightforward remarks alerted Bulareyaung to the fact that they were different from dancers who had had formal school training: they preferred to base their dance movements on actual physical experiences.

Hence Bulareyaung took his dancers into indigen­ous communities to prepare land for planting, move stones, and pick ginger, turning these traditional forms of ­labor into experiences for their bodies. It is this learning based in daily life that enables BDC’s works to avoid the sense of distance that the general public often feels toward modern dance and to add an element of sincerity and authenticity. Sitting in the theater, one can almost feel the sea breeze from the Pacific Ocean.

Learning from daily life

Bulareyaung relates that when he returned to Taitung he had the ambition to choreograph a grand work of indigenous dance with a Western structure, but in the end he couldn’t do it. “That was because I didn’t under­stand indigenous peoples. I didn’t even understand the traditions of my own Paiwan tribe, nor could I speak our language, so how could I even begin to do it?” So he took his troupe members into indigenous communities to learn folk songs. “It was only later that I realized that if you simply live earnestly, life will present you with the material for creative work.”

For example, the 2016 work Qaciljay, BDC’s second production, was created by Bulareyaung after he returned to his birthplace of Buliblosan (Chinese name Jialan) and learned an ancient Paiwan warriors’ song. The first day of rehearsals, Bulareyaung said to the dancers: “Let’s join hands, and don’t let go, and we’ll see what happens.” Forty minutes later, when they had all reached the limits of their physical strength, some exhausted dancers gave up and sat down, but they were pulled up by the hands of others. There were others who grew more excited the more tired they became, and their singing got louder and louder. Thus what had seemed like a repetitively simple traditional dance went through many variations, and revealed the powerful spiritual force that emerges when people face difficulties together. It also reflected how, so long as we hold each other’s hands, when we are faced with problems in life there will always be someone at our side.

Bulareyaung has never regretted returning to Taitung, but running a dance company is not easy and there have been no end of challenges. In 2016 Typhoon Nepartak, which caused severe damage in Taitung, blew the roof off the company’s rehearsal space. The interior was devast­ated, making it impossible to proceed with rehearsals for the new work Colors. The company could only put on their rain boots and practice singing as they cleaned up and temporarily replaced the roof with tarpaulins, for they still had to carry on with daily life and perform as scheduled. Seeing how everyone came together to get through this hardship, Bulareyaung was moved and had the sudden inspiration to have the company perform Colors on a tarpaulin, in their rain boots. It looked a little rustic at first glance, but the energy produced by facing up to adversity introduced a new element of life’s beauty into the work.

Reacting to society

BDC has many faces, from the masculine valor of Qacil­jay and the quirky appeal of Colors to the troupe members singing madly at the Taiwan Pasiwali Festival, using ­familiar old songs to energize the atmosphere at the event. When asked which of his works is most represent­ative of the company, Bulareyaung tilts his head, at a loss for an answer. “Our performers dance, and sing, and also speak and act, so we’re hard to define. We seem to combine all the performing arts. The most important thing is that we never turn our back on traditional culture.” One can learn something about BDC from each individual work, but from any given piece one can only learn a part of who they are.

By his own account, in the past Bulareyaung never paid attention to social issues, and still less to indigenous issues. He felt that as an artist his greatest contribution to society was simply to produce good works. But since returning to Taitung, he has been surrounded by the past, present, and future of Taiwan’s indigenous peoples. Their concerns have become part of his life, and caused him to leave his comfort zone. As a result, BDC productions are often responses to the contemporary environment.

During the 2017 occupation of Taipei’s Ketagalan Bou­le­vard in protest over the issue of traditional indigenous territories, BDC came north several times to show their support. At that time they were in the middle of rehearsals for a new production, Stay That Way, so they were unable to stay with the protestors. But when they began performing the piece, they transported some of the colorful rocks that had been brought to Ketagalan Boulevard from vari­ous indigenous communities to their performance space and shared the protest with audience members. Three women indigenous singers were invited to take part in the work, and there was thrilling interplay between their life stories and ringing voices, and the movements of the dancers. Through this production BDC expressed the difficult situation that indigenous people have long been facing. Although audiences did not understand the words of the songs being sung, the grief and sorrow conveyed by the voices brought tears to their eyes.

Since 2015, BDC has toured indigenous communities, putting on performances and holding seminars. Bula­reyaung says that the work they perform most often there is Warriors, before which the dancers share their personal stories from the stage. This allows communities to see a different side of indigen­ous dance, and the work gives indigenous parents the courage to support their children in pursuing their dreams. The performances create a shared image in the minds of parents and children.

On the path of learning

Having staged their first work, La Song, in 2015, BDC is now in its sixth year. They had originally scheduled a new production, Not Afraid of Sun and Rain, for 2020, but due to the Covid-19 pandemic it has been put off until 2021.

At the core of this work is pakalungay, a youth learning stage in Amis culture. “Not afraid of sun, not afraid of rain” are words from a song sung during the training. Sunshine and rain are nature’s ways of tempering us, but they also represent obstacles that people encounter in life. Through this production Bulareyaung hopes to encourage people to have no fear, and tell them that the joy of life comes from overcoming adversity. He says that BDC, at five years old, is like a child going through pakalungay—it has just started and is learning little by little. “When you see yourself as a learner, you will be more humble, and the works you produce will be more sincere. This sincerity is basic to art.”

Having gone from trying to erase his indigenous identity, to adopting his Aboriginal name, to returning home again, I ask Bulareyaung if he feels that he is fully an indigen­ous person inside and out. He thinks for a minute, then slowly replies: “The Bulareyaung that existed before returning to Taitung was very successful, but I was empty, and felt confused about my identity. In the five years since I returned to Taitung, I’ve become more myself, and I’m getting ever closer to being the Bulareyaung that I want to become.” Even today he often asks himself, “Am I myself yet?” The answer? “I feel I’m still on the way there.”    

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

日本語 繁體

故郷で踊る

—— 台東で羽ばたく 布拉瑞揚舞踊団

文・陳群芳 写真・莊坤儒 翻訳・山口 雪菜

台東の布拉瑞揚舞踊団(Bulareyaung Dance Company)のフェイスブックを開くと、パイワン語で「故郷への帰還は完全な生命の延長であり、布拉瑞揚舞踊団の扉は開かれている」と書かれている。これは振付師の布拉瑞揚が稽古場を開放して、台東で夢を追う姿を人々と共有したいというメッセージを伝えている。この5年、布拉瑞揚は常に原住民族の青年たちと手を取り合い、大地から養分を得て、すばらしい舞踊作品を生み出してきた。初心を貫き、扉を開いて多くの人とともに舞踊と原住民文化のすばらしさを追求しているのである。


パイワン族の振付師‧布拉瑞揚は、かつて雲門舞集(クラウド‧ゲイト舞踊団)と米国のマーサ‧グラハム‧ダンスカンパニーで振付師として活躍し、その作品は欧米でも高く評価されている。しかし彼は、その絶頂期に故郷‧台東へ帰り、布拉瑞揚舞踊団を結成した。15歳で故郷を離れて都会でダンスを学んできた彼は、40歳になるまで常に仕事に没頭し、休むことなくダンスに取り組んできた。台東への帰還を決めた時、友人たちは3ヶ月も持たないだろうと冗談を言ったが、それからすでに5年の歳月がたった。

「私は誰なのか?」

堂々と自らを語り、さわやかに笑う布拉瑞揚を前にすると、以前はシャイで人づきあいが苦手だったとはとても思えない。彼は高校の時に台東の山地から高雄へ移った。全校で原住民の生徒は彼一人だけで、言葉に訛りがあるため、なかなか口を開いて話すことができなかったという。

「以前は自分の中にこもって一人で創作していましたが、台東に戻ってからは自分らしく肩の力を抜けるようになりました」と、台東が彼の心の扉を開かせたと語る。すべては「私は誰?」という問いから始まった。都会のルールは彼を型にはめ、謹厳な布拉瑞揚を作り出したが、故郷の大地を踏み、原住民青年たちと一緒に働くことで、彼は楽天的な天性を取り戻していった。

布拉瑞揚舞踊団は、台湾の原住民族各族から成り、正規の舞踊教育を受けていないメンバーが重要な役割を果たしている。以前の振り付けの仕事では、まずダンサーたちにテーマを与え、それぞれが稽古場の隅で自身の肉体でそれを解釈し、10分後には一人ひとりが5分間の表現素材として発表するというプロセスを踏んでいた。一作品の制作期間は通常1ヶ月で、10時間で完成させなければならないこともあり、ダンサーとじっくり磨き上げる時間もなかったという。一人で頭を絞って振り付けを考え、稽古場でそのまま指示を出して完成させることもあった。

台東へ戻ったばかりの頃、布拉瑞揚はこの習慣で振り付けを行なおうとした。メンバーたちに海というテーマを与えたが、10分、30分たっても誰も答えを出せない。幾度か試みた末、メンバーからこう言われた。「先生、イメージしろなんて言わないでください。山へ行って働きましょう」「台北の頭で仕事をしないでくださいよ。これだと、求めるものは永遠に出てきません」と。メンバーの正直な言葉で布拉瑞揚の目は覚めた。彼らは正統の舞踊教育を受けたダンサーではなく、身体の真の感覚をインスピレーションとしていることに気づいたのである。

そこで彼は、メンバーを海辺に連れていき、波が体に当たった時の身体の変化を感じさせ、また集落で整地や収穫などを行ない、昔からの労働を肉体の養分とした。こうした生活を通した学習により、舞踊団の作品は、コンテンポラリーダンス特有の大衆との距離感がなく、心を感じさせるものとなった。ダンサーの身体を通した表現は、劇場内でも太平洋の風を感じさせる。

生活の中から養分を

台東に戻ったばかりの頃、布拉瑞揚は西洋の構造を持った原住民舞踊の大作を作るという野心を抱いていたが、それは無理だと気付いた。「自分も原住民族を理解していないからです。これほど多くの民族があり、自分が属するパイワンの伝統や言語さえよく知らないのですから」と言う。そこで彼はメンバーを率いて集落で歌を学び、労働に参加した。「まじめに暮らせば、それが創作の要素をあたえてくれることに気づきました」

例えば舞踊団創設第2作、2016年の『阿棲睞』は、布拉瑞揚が生まれた嘉蘭集落で学んだ歌謡「卡達」から創作した。「卡達」は男性ばかりが手をつないで歌う勇士の歌だ。稽古の初日、彼はメンバーにこう言った。「手をつなごう。手をつないで、それを絶対に放さなければ何が起こるか見てみよう」と。40分後、彼らの疲労は極限に達し、座り込んでしまう人もいたが、手をつないでいるので引っ張られて動く。疲労のあまり興奮状態になって大声で歌い始める人もいる。最初は皆が同じ伝統舞踊を踊っていたのが、こうして次第に一人ひとりの個性が表れてきたのである。力強い動作と歌声の中、困難に直面した時の強大な精神力や、手をつなぐことで、誰かが支えてくれることが表現されたのである。

台東に戻ったことを後悔したことはないが、舞踊団の経営は容易ではない。2016年に台風の被害に見舞われた時は稽古場の屋根が吹き飛ばされ、新作『漂亮漂亮』の稽古ができず、雨合羽を着て掃除をしながら歌を練習した。そして屋根をシートで覆い、予定通り公演を実施したのである。皆が団結して困難を乗り越える姿を見て、布拉瑞揚は、メンバーに雨靴を履かせ、シートの上で踊らせることにした。困難に立ち向かう力強さを通して、生命の美を表現したのである。

作品で社会に応える

『阿棲睞』の力強さ、『漂亮漂亮』の女性らしさ、そして原住民国際音楽フェスティバルでのメンバーたちの弾けた姿など、場所や作品によって布拉瑞揚舞踊団はさまざまな表情を見せる。舞踊団創設以来、彼らは6つの作品を作ってきたが、代表作は、と問うと布拉瑞揚は首を傾げ、困ったような表情を見せる。「私たちは踊り、歌い、話し、芝居もするので定義するのは困難です。あらゆるパフォーマンスアートを総合していますが、最も大切なのは伝統文化に背かないことです」と言う。どの作品を通しても布拉瑞揚舞踊団を知ることができるが、それは舞踊団の表情の一部分にすぎないのである。

布拉瑞揚によると、以前彼は社会問題や原住民族に関する課題に関心を持っていなかった。アーティストとしてよい作品を生み出すことが最大の社会貢献だと考えていたのである。しかし、台東に戻ってからは、原住民族の過去、現在、未来が自らの生活の一部となり、そこにある問題を直視するようになった。

2017年、原住民族の伝統領域に関する大規模な抗議活動が台北の凱達格蘭大道で行われた時、布拉瑞揚も幾度も台北に行って参加した。ちょうど新作の『無,或就以沈酔為名』の稽古中だったため、参加し続けることはできなかったが、舞踊団のメンバーは凱達格蘭大道にあった色を塗った石を雲門劇場へ運び、観客にもこの運動を知ってもらった。この作品では原住民女性歌手も3人招いた。原舞者の創設メンバーである3人は、長年にわたって伝統歌舞の復興に力を注いでおり、それぞれの人生の物語とすばらしい歌声が、布拉瑞揚のダンサーたちと美しく共鳴した。この作品は、長い歳月にわたる原住民族の境遇を表現するもので、歌詞はわからなくても、そこから伝わる悲しみに観客は涙を流した。

2015年から、布拉瑞揚舞踊団は各地の集落で作品を上演し、講座を開いている。最もよく上演する作品は『勇者』で、開演前にダンサーたちがそれぞれの人生の物語を語る。集落の人々に原住民ダンサーの別の表情を見てもらい、集落の親たちに、子供の夢を応援してほしいと訴えかける。将来、子供たちが夢を持った時、親子の脳裏には布拉瑞揚舞踊団のシーンが浮かぶことだろう。

学びの道を行く

2015年に発表した最初の作品『拉歌』からすでに6年目に入り、予期していたより多くのことができたと布拉瑞揚は言う。海外公演やダンス教室の開設など、着々と前進している。今年(2020年)発表する予定だった『没有害怕太陽和下雨』は、コロナ禍で来年に延期された。

この作品の物語は、アミ族が伝統の年齢階層に入る前の、Pakalungayと呼ばれる青少年学習者の段階を中心としている。「太陽を恐れず、雨を恐れない」というのはPakalungayの訓練の歌だ。太陽と雨は大自然がもたらす試練であり、それは人生で遭遇する困難でもある。布拉瑞揚はこの作品を通して、「恐れずに、自分を見つめなおそう。人生の喜びは苦難を乗り越えることでやってくる」と人々を励ましたいと考えている。5歳の布拉瑞揚舞踊団はPakalungayと同じだ。まだ歩き始めたばかりで、さまざまなものを学んでいかなければならない。「自らを学習者と位置付けることで謙虚になれ、作り出す作品も誠実なものになります。その誠実さこそ芸術の本質なのです」と布拉瑞揚は言う。

彼は祖霊の導きに感謝し、「自分が原住民であることを幸せに思います」と言う。その豊かな文化が養分となり、より多くの素材を提供してくれるのである。かつては原住民族の色彩を消したいと思ったが、今は民族の名を取り戻し、故郷へ帰ってきた。今は完全な原住民だと思うか、という問いに、彼は少し考えてこう答えた。「台東へ戻る前の布拉瑞揚は、表面はきれいでしたが中身は空っぽで、顔立ちも明確ではありませんでした。台東へ戻って5年たち、少しずつ眉毛が生え、鼻や輪郭も少しずつ私がなりたい布拉瑞揚に近づいてきているようです」と。そして今も「今日は自分自身を生きただろうか?」と自らに問いかけ、まだ道半ばだと思うのである。

回家跳舞

布拉瑞揚舞團

文‧陳群芳 圖‧莊坤儒

「a tjumaq si ljazuan nua nasi, semu qeljev ta paljing ti Bulareyaung.」布拉瑞揚舞團臉書上,用排灣族語寫著:「回家是完整生命的延續,布拉開門。」這是編舞家布拉瑞揚敞開排練場,與民眾分享他回到台東築夢的活動文宣。轉眼五年過去,布拉瑞揚始終牽著原住民青年的手,將土地的養分化為一支支精彩舞作,一如初衷,打開門,邀請大眾共同探尋舞蹈與原住民文化的美好。


排灣族編舞家布拉瑞揚曾為雲門舞集、美國瑪莎‧葛蘭姆舞團編舞,作品演出遍及歐美,在國際舞蹈圈獲得極高的評價。但就在編舞事業如日中天之時,他卻選擇回到家鄉台東成立布拉瑞揚舞團。自15歲便離家到城市習舞的布拉瑞揚,40歲以前的他,是每天外帶一杯咖啡便停不下來的工作狂,生活節奏緊湊;回台東這個決定,朋友開玩笑地打賭他撐不過三個月,沒想到,這一待就超過五年。

我是誰的探問

看著眼前侃侃而談,不時發出爽朗笑聲的布拉瑞揚,很難想像過去的他為人嚴肅、不擅社交。布拉瑞揚高中就從台東山上前往高雄的城市就讀,全校就他一位原住民,擔心自己的口音會引來嘲笑,求學時期的布拉瑞揚很少開口,還曾被誤會是個啞巴。

一般人腦海裡的原住民,是講話山地腔、會抽菸喝酒嚼檳榔的形象。為了推翻這些刻板印象,布拉瑞揚刻意矯正自己的咬字,堅持不碰菸酒檳榔,連買個泡麵都要穿著體面,他逼自己塑造某種形象,要讓大家知道原住民也可以很優秀。

「過去的我總是關起門獨自創作,回來之後我變得比較輕鬆自在。」布拉瑞揚表示,台東讓他重新被打開,這一切的根本還是回到「我是誰」這件事的探討。城市裡的教條像是框框,型塑出拘謹的布拉瑞揚。然而腳踩家鄉的土地後,與原住民青年一同工作,讓布拉瑞揚一點一滴找回樂天的天性。

而布拉瑞揚舞團裡來自原住民各族、非舞蹈科班出身的團員們,便是其中很重要的開關。布拉瑞揚表示,以前編舞會先提供舞者一個主題,然後各自找個角落,用自己的身體詮釋,十分鐘後舞者可以創作五分鐘的表演素材。且一部作品通常一個月,甚至十個小時就要完成,布拉瑞揚笑說哪有時間跟舞者磨,當然是自己絞盡腦汁編想,進到排練場直接給舞者指令,咻咻咻地在短時間內完成編舞。

剛回到台東時,布拉瑞揚帶著習慣的編舞模式,請團員們詮釋關於海的想像,結果十分鐘、半小時過去,沒人能交出答案。嘗試幾次後,舞者坦率地說:「老師你不要再叫我們想像,你帶我們去勞動、去山上。」甚至還開玩笑地說:「你不要再用台北的腦袋跟我們工作,你永遠得不到你想要的。」這些舞者的真心話點醒了布拉瑞揚,他們與以前科班的舞者不同,他們是透過身體的真實感受,轉化為肢體的靈感。

於是布拉瑞揚帶著團員去海邊,感受浪花打在身上時,肢體能有怎樣的變化;去部落整地、搬運石頭、採生薑,讓這些傳統的勞動成為身體的養分。就是這些源自於生活的學習,讓舞團的作品少了大眾對現代舞的距離感,多了一分真誠,透過舞者肢體的詮釋,彷彿在劇場裡就能感受到太平洋的海風。

來自生活的養分

布拉瑞揚表示,自己剛回來時有個企圖心,想要編一個很大的製作,是原住民舞蹈但有西方結構的作品,結果根本做不來,「因為我根本不懂原住民,原住民這麼多族,我連自己排灣族的傳統都不懂,族語也不會講,哪能作啊!」所以他帶著團員回部落學歌謠、參與勞動,「後來我才知道原來認真生活,生活會給你創作的元素。」

例如,2016年創團的第二支作品《阿棲睞》,就是布拉瑞揚回到他出生的嘉蘭部落學習歌謠〈卡達〉所創作的。〈卡達〉是一首全部男生手牽手一起唱的勇士歌,作品排練的第一天,布拉瑞揚跟舞者說:「我們把手牽起來,牽了就不要放掉,看看會發生甚麼事。」40分鐘後,當大家的體能來到極限,面對身體的疲憊,有人放棄坐下來,但手仍被其他人拖著走;也有人越累越亢奮,越唱越大聲。於是原本看起來一樣動作的傳統舞,有了變奏,展現了每個舞者的個性。在鏗鏘有力的動作與歌聲中,這支舞展現了人在面對困境時,那股強大的精神力量;也呼應了只要彼此牽著手,面對生活的困難,身旁總會有人陪著。

布拉瑞揚從未後悔回到台東,但舞團經營不容易,考驗也沒少過。2016年尼伯特颱風重創台東,吹走了排練場的屋頂,新作《漂亮漂亮》的排練無法進行,團員們只能穿著雨鞋打掃、練唱,用帆布權充屋頂,日子照樣要過,演出依舊如期。看著大家團結度過難關的模樣,布拉瑞揚深受感動,靈機一動,決定讓團員穿著雨鞋、在帆布上跳《漂亮漂亮》,乍看有點土氣,但那種因面對困境而生的力量,卻帶來了另一種生命的美麗。

過去每分每秒都講求精準的布拉瑞揚,就是在各種生活的學習中,漸漸地學會隨遇而安。他說團員開啟了他另一種編舞模式,他也在團員質樸的肢體表現中,看到了新的身體語彙。以傳統歌謠的學習為本,布拉瑞揚舞團發展出了屬於他們的表演形式,而這樣特殊的風格在舞蹈圈少有,不僅令觀眾驚豔,也讓他們入圍四屆的台新藝術獎,其中還連續兩年獲得大獎的肯定。

用作品回應社會

看過《阿棲睞》的陽剛英勇、《漂亮漂亮》撫媚中帶點三八,也看到原住民國際音樂節上團員們瘋狂飆歌,用耳熟能詳的老歌炒熱現場氣氛,不同場合、不同作品,布拉瑞揚舞團有著各種面貌。創團至今,布拉瑞揚舞團製作了六支作品,問及哪支是代表作時,布拉瑞揚側著頭有點苦惱,「我們的舞團要跳、又要唱,還要講話和演戲,很難被定義,好像綜合了所有表演藝術,最重要的是我們沒有背棄傳統文化。」藉由每個作品都可以認識布拉瑞揚舞團,但都只能認識一部分的他們。

談到無法定義,布拉瑞揚分享了一個創團第一年的小插曲,「舞團排練的第一天卻沒有排練,因為我們去街上抗議。」原來那天嘉蘭部落隔壁的新園部落正在舉行抗議養雞場興建的遊行,布拉瑞揚二話不說跟著響應,帶著舞者加入遊行,彷彿注定了舞團緊連社會脈動的行事風格。布拉瑞揚自述,以前的他不關心社會議題,更不會關注原住民議題,他認為身為藝術工作者,產出好作品就是對社會最大的貢獻;但回到台東後,原住民的過去、現在、未來包圍著他,就是他的生活,讓他走出舒適圈,參與原民議題。

2017年原住民傳統領域議題在凱達格蘭大道上的駐紮行動,布拉瑞揚舞團多次北上響應。當時正在準備新作《無,或就以沉醉為名》的排練,雖無法與抗議者時時同在,但團員們把凱道上彩繪的石頭搬到雲門劇場,並與觀眾分享這場「沒有人是局外人」的抗議行動。作品裡邀請了三位原住民女歌手,曾是原舞者創始團員的她們,已在復興傳統樂舞的路上走了很久,以她們的生命故事和嘹亮歌聲,與舞者碰撞出精彩的火花。舞團透過這支作品來表述原住民長久以來所遭遇的處境,雖然聽不懂歌謠的詞意,但歌聲中傳遞的悲戚,讓人聽了就忍不住掉淚。

自2015年開始布拉瑞揚舞團帶著作品到各部落巡演、舉辦講座。布拉瑞揚表示,他們最常在部落演出的作品是《勇者》,開演前舞者會在台上分享自己的故事,透過這些曾被家長反對跳舞的團員的真心分享,讓部落看到原住民舞蹈的另一種樣貌,藉著作品給部落的爸爸媽媽勇氣來支持孩子追夢。讓舞團的演出,成為彼此心中共通的畫面,也許台下會有孩子像當年的布拉瑞揚一樣,因為被感動而立志舞出一片天。

走在學習者的路上

從2015年推出創團第一支作品《拉歌》,舞團邁入第六年,布拉瑞揚說:「因為有大家的關愛,舞團做的事情比我預期的多很多。」像是出國演出、開設舞蹈課等,以紮實卻略帶速度的步伐前進。原定今(2020)年推出新作《沒有害怕太陽和下雨》,卻因為遇到新冠肺炎疫情而延至明(2021)年。

這部作品以阿美族進入年齡階層前、稱之為「巴卡路奈(Pakalungay)」的青少年學習者階段為主調核心,「沒有害怕太陽、沒有害怕下雨」就是巴卡路奈的訓練唱詞。太陽和下雨是大自然給的磨練,也可以是人生中遇到的困難,布拉瑞揚希望透過作品鼓舞大家不要害怕,重新面對自己,人生的喜樂便是從克服苦難而來。他說,五歲的布拉瑞揚舞團就像是巴卡路奈,剛起步,還在一點一滴的學習,「當認定自己是個學習者,就會更謙卑,做出來的作品會更真誠,而那個真誠才是藝術的本質。」布拉瑞揚說。

布拉瑞揚很感謝祖靈指引他回來,「我很幸運自己是原住民。」得以被豐富的文化養分滋潤,有了許多創作素材。從試圖抹去原住民色彩、復名,到回鄉,問布拉瑞揚覺得自己裡裡外外都是原住民了嗎?他想了想,緩緩地說,「回台東前的布拉瑞揚很漂亮,但我是空的,五官不清楚;回台東這五年眉毛有一點了,鼻子、輪廓越來越接近我想成為的布拉瑞揚。」至今他仍常自問「到今天我做了我自己了嗎?我覺得我還在路上。」                               

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!