Chou Lien, Child of Light

:::

2017 / May

Liu Yingfeng /photos courtesy of Chuang Kung-ju /tr. by Robert Green


From the distant Statue of Liberty in the United States and the Petronas Towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, all the way to sites in Taiwan such as the old city wall in Heng­chun, Tai­nan’s century-old Feng­shen Temple, Bei­gang’s Chao­tian Temple, or the Chi­mei Museum, the magical creations of world-­renowned lighting designer Chou Lien are found the world over.


 

On arriving at Chou Lien’s home, visitors might think it is decorated in a rather ordinary fashion. But within the commonplace lurk the extraordinary principles of his work. When he turns up the lights, small spotlights above the kitchen island begin to shine softly, then circular hanging lamps above the kitchen table start to glow. When the hour is late, Chou dims the lights and savors the night’s solitude enveloped in the gentle glow. When he flicks on the lights beneath the table, the interplay of light and dark lends the surface an even more three-dimensional appearance.

The plaudits of admiring visitors bring a hint of pride to Chou Lien’s confident, elegant smile, and he continues his playful tour of the house’s lighting with all the more vigor.

The importance of perception

When he describes light, 74-year-old Chou Lien doesn’t need a torrent of words or technical terminology; he simply emphasizes the term “perception.” For him, the presence of light is not about wattage, lumens, and color temperature, or any of the professional argot of the field.

This unique outlook is perhaps tied to Chou Lien’s lifelong inclination toward art and design. Compared to his older brother and sister, who attended the prestigious National Taiwan University, Chou Lien was a lackluster student from his earliest days at school. In junior and senior high school, his textbooks were covered with doodles and drawings. When his mother fretted over her younger son’s schoolwork, his father consoled her in their native Ningbo dialect. “Don’t worry,” he said. “He just hasn’t found his life’s path yet.”

Chou Lien grew up in the liberating environment of an unconventional family and was unconstrained by traditional norms of others. A half-century ago, he enrolled in the National Taiwan Academy of Arts (now National Taiwan University of Arts) where he studied sculpture. In the 1970s he traveled to the US, where he earned an advanced degree in sculpture. He also minored in film studies and later took advanced courses in environmental design at the Pratt Institute, New York. His interests led him down this interdisciplinary path, and while he might not have expected these eclectic courses to lead anywhere, they became a rich source of inspiration after he became a lighting designer.  

In 1978, Chou again went to the US to study. During the summer break, he accepted a classmate’s invitation to work part time as a designer at Brandston Partnership Inc., a leading architectural lighting design firm. After a single day as a part-timer, Chou impressed BPI executives, and soon he was making a better salary than regular employees. Before long he was invited to join the firm full time, and he became the sole designer of presentation schematics for all of BPI’s project ­managers. Chou’s exceptional performance allowed him to leapfrog from BPI’s most junior employee to design director in four short years. He was later made a partner in the firm and eventually became its president.        

Lighting with people in mind

For the past 30-plus years, Chou Lien’s role at BPI has largely played out on an international stage. But in recent years he has accepted commissions to rework the lighting at Tai­nan’s Feng­shen Temple and the old city wall in Heng­chun, Ping­tung County, which allowed him to spend more time in Taiwan and become better known locally.    

Many people believe Chou’s lighting style is characterized chiefly by the reduction of light. But Chou is quick to disagree. In his view, lighting design is not bound by in­viol­able, immutable principles. The low light of his designs for Feng­shen Temple and the Heng­chun city wall might be entirely discarded in future projects.

If we look at the lighting design Chou created this year for Chao­tian Temple in Bei­gang, Yun­lin County, we find that it is indeed the case. “Isn’t it bright?” he says. “It’s bright enough, surely!”

Chou and his design team installed 300 4000K LED lamps around the temple. The exquisite carvings of the temple’s roof used to be obscured when night fell, but following the redesign the roof’s craftsmanship is clearly visible from the street or from higher elevations even at night. The 300-year-old temple has come more fully to life.

Light is manipulated in Chou Lien’s hands with easy skill. But with each commission, he still starts with the premise of “setting out with people in mind and responding to the environment.” Chou explains that many people think lighting design is the same as lighting. But for people to sense the qualities of light, it must possess humanistic qualities. One night during his childhood, he lit a candle during a typhoon, and as he moved it about his mother’s shadow grew larger or smaller. To this day that chance encounter with light is seared into his memory and his mother’s appearance in those moments lives in his heart. “Light was no longer just light,” he says; “It also contained memories of the past.” This is what he means by “the perception of light.”

He also used this concept as the starting point for his approach to lighting both the exterior and interior of the Chi­mei Museum in Tai­nan. For this project, Chou concentrated on highlighting the best of the architectural structure. But just what is meant by “the best”? “It was not enough to just highlight the beauty of the building,” he says. “I wanted to incorporate cultural and social aspects into the design.”

He therefore attempted to use communal pride as a guiding principle in the lighting design, so that local ­people would swell with pride when they caught sight of the Chi­mei Museum as they approached along Provincial Highway 86 at night.  

When Chou Lien took on the Heng­chun city wall project, he encountered a whole series of questions that he had to sort out before he could start the design: Did the old wall still function as a wall? If the wall was intended to defend the town but the gates were meant to both repel and welcome, what significance did they have in the daily lives of people today? Moreover, the architecture had its own unique characteristics.

Chou therefore opted for a reserved, minimalist approach to the lighting. At the West Gate, he first installed lights in the passage beneath the gate to contrast with the public square outside, creating a visual sense of interior brightness against the darker exterior, to give people a sense of returning home as they pass through. Later at night, Chou’s design allows the gate to rest in darkness, with a few lights illuminating only the Chinese characters reading “West Gate.”

Chou Lien has been invited to create lighting designs in cities and counties stretching from southern to northern Taiwan—Ping­tung, Tai­nan and Yun­lin to Tai­pei, where he designed illuminations for the North Gate and for the streets to the west of Tai­pei Railway Station. He has even been asked to use his skills for the 2018 Tai­chung World Flora Exposition. He is said to have influenced all of Taiwan’s younger lighting designers in one way or another. After stepping down as BPI president, Chou, far from retiring, has been returning to Taiwan even more often to teach and lecture—unselfishly sharing a lifetime of lighting design experience with students in Taiwan.    

Sometimes when he says “light,” however, it seems as if he is speaking of the “path.” In his youth, the now-­grizzled Chou Lian liked reading above all Laozi’s Tao Te ­Ching, Sunzi’s strategic masterpiece The Art of War, and The Book of Five Rings by the Japanese author Mi­ya­moto Mu­sa­shi, which describes the way of the sword. In youth he took to heart these works and their implications for the actions and concepts of life. As he grew older, they became an integral part of his own life and allow him to intuit the fundamental properties of light.        

繁體中文 日文

點亮台灣 光的頑童──周鍊

文‧劉嫈楓 圖‧莊坤儒 翻譯‧Robert Green

遠從美國自由女神、馬來西亞吉隆坡雙子星,乃至台灣屏東恆春古城、台南風神廟、奇美博物館、雲林北港朝天宮……,世界各地都有這位國際燈光設計大師周鍊施展的光之幻術。

 


 

「你看,美吧!」來到周鍊家中,外人看來平凡無奇的裝飾,裡頭竟暗藏玄機。他輕滑開關,不一會兒,廚房中島上方的幾盞小燈緩緩透出溫暖光芒;餐廳桌上方的圓形吊燈亮了起來,讓人們放下忙亂喧擾。時間晚了,他乾脆將燈調暗,在一片柔光中,獨自享受夜晚。

聽著來訪賓客讚嘆頻頻的哇哇聲,周鍊自信優雅的笑容閃過一絲得意,下一刻更加起勁地展示屋裡的每一處燈光設計。

察覺「光」之所在

言談間,沒有滔滔不絕、複雜難懂的專業術語,今年74歲的周鍊,對光的形容,僅僅只有「感知」一詞的簡單。對他而言,光的存在不只是「瓦數」、「流明」抑或「色溫」……,種種的照明術語。

如此特別的取徑,或許和周鍊藝術設計的背景有關。家中排行老三的周鍊,和一路就讀第一志願、考上台大的兄姊相比,從小書就讀得不好。初中、高中的課本上面都是塗鴉繪畫,母親操煩次子的學業,反倒父親看得開,操著家鄉寧波話安慰周鍊母親,說著:「你別擔心,這孩子的靈魂還沒生根。」

身處自由、開放的家風,社會的傳統框架從未限制著他。五十多年前,周鍊便進入國立藝專(現為國立台灣藝術大學)就讀美術科雕塑組;1970年代赴美攻讀雕塑後,周鍊還副修電影,加上後來進入美國普瑞特學院攻讀環境設計,這些當初因興趣而跨界選讀的「無用之用」,都成為他走入燈光設計領域後,最豐厚的養分。

「雕塑讓我懂得無所畏懼的創作;電影教會了我面向人們溝通;以業主需求為優先的設計專業,則鍛鍊了他有效管理生產流程。」周鍊說。深諳藝術與實務的拿捏,讓他很快地在燈光設計領域嶄露頭角。

1978年,周鍊二度赴美攻讀學位,暑假期間,他應同學之邀,前往美國燈光設計領域龍頭BPI公司兼差。才工作一天,周鍊馬上就獲得BPI主管青睞,開出比正職員工更好的薪資,邀請他進入公司。當時,BPI公司內所有專案經理開會時的簡報用圖,全出自於周鍊。優異的表現,讓周鍊在短短4年內,便從最資淺的員工成為BPI設計總監,並一路晉升為公司合夥人,而後掌舵成為總裁。

以人為本,呼應環境

過去三十多年,執掌BPI的周鍊,多半現身在國際舞台。近年來,他應邀為台南風神廟、屏東恆春古城操刀改造燈光設計,停留台灣時間變得更多,名字出現的次數也更加頻繁。

燈光經過重置、改造,讓兩處超過百年的古蹟廟宇,以全新面貌驚艷各方。許多人皆以為周鍊的燈光美學,唯有減光。但周鍊急忙說不,在他眼裡,燈光設計從未有奉行不悖、不可顛覆的原理。應用於台南風神廟、恆春古城的「減光」設計,下一刻就可全數拋棄。

目光轉至今年他為北港朝天宮的燈光設計,果真如此。「亮不亮?夠亮了吧!」他說。周鍊與設計團隊,以近300顆4000K的LED燈泡,設置在廟宇四周。過往入夜,朝天宮屋頂上方精緻的剪黏技藝全被夜色掩蓋。經過改造後,信眾從街上望去,抑或站在高處俯瞰,廟宇屋頂上的工藝全看得一清二楚,歷史超過300年的朝天宮,建築變得更加立體。

光的把戲,在周鍊手中,玩得嫻熟自在。但他經手的每一樁設計案,都不脫「以人出發,呼應環境」的初衷。周鍊表示,許多人以為,論及燈光設計就等同照明技術,但人若感知了光,裡頭就擁有更多人文的溫度。兒時一場颱風夜,他點起蠟燭,把玩燭光,那時媽媽的影子忽大忽小。那回與光的偶然相遇,至今都深深烙印在他腦中,媽媽那時的樣子也留在他的心裡。「光不再只是光,還有著過往的記憶。」這就是他口中,「對光的察覺」 。

他為台南奇美博物館建築主體、內部展場的設計,也同樣以此出發。承接設計案後,周鍊想的是如何表現建築最好的一面。但何謂「最好」?「只是將建築的光打得漂亮是不夠的,而是超越硬體建築,將人文、社會的一面,納入設計。」因此,「台南人的驕傲」被放到周鍊的設計主軸。期待台南市民夜裡駛過86號快速道路,遠眺奇美博物館時,心中必將萌生驕傲。

周鍊經手恆春古城的改造時,一系列的提問更在設計之前出現。「如今的城還以為城嗎?」「城為防禦,而門則是『拒』與『迎』,這意味城門與人們的日常生活息息相關。」「而建築本身也有自己的生命。」因此,周鍊選擇內斂、減法的燈光設計。先是在城門隧道內放入幾盞燈,對比外頭的廣場,營造內明外暗的視覺效果,讓人行經通道,都彷若有回家的歸屬感。而夜色漸晚,周鍊也讓百年城門跟著歇息,僅留下幾盞燈,照亮「西門」字樣。

從光出發,以人為本,而後思考與環境的關係,周鍊的設計哲學,充滿了「整體觀」。從周鍊畫下的草圖,就可明白箇中道理。原本面朝他的筆記本,周鍊先是180度大翻轉,將頁面朝向對方,隨後熟練地倒筆畫下一處城門草圖,並隨著一磚、一草與周遭環境不同的視覺需求,標記上燈光瓦數,牽一「燈」而動全身。既然如此複雜,曾有人問他,何不就將計算任務交給電腦,「現場展現出的光環境,是憑著科技計算全然無法查知的」。

由南至北,屏東、台南、雲林,一路到台北北門圓環、西區門戶計畫周邊道路,以至2018年即將於台中展開的世界花卉博覽會,皆邀請周鍊操刀。有人說,台灣燈光設計領域的新生代,都曾受到周鍊的影響。卸下美國照明公司BPI總裁一職後,本該退休的他,近來更時常返台舉辦課程、講座,將一生照明設計的本領無私地奉獻給台灣的年輕朋友。

然而,聽他說「光」,有時更像聽他講道。頭髮花白的他,青春時候最愛讀的書,是老子的《道德經》,是談謀略說縱局《孫子兵法》,以及日本宮本武藏講述劍法哲理的《五輪書》……,那些年輕時候,存於心中尚不明白的人生動與念,隨著歲月前進,全融入在周鍊的生命,讓他以「光」演繹。

光の中に遊ぶ周錬

文・劉嫈楓 写真・莊坤儒 翻訳・久保 恵子

アメリカの自由の女神、マレーシアのクアラルンプールにあるペトロナスツインタワーから、台湾屏東県の恒春古城、台南の風神廟や奇美博物館、雲林県の北港朝天宮など、国際的な照明デザイナー周錬の光のファンタジーが世界各地に繰り広げられている。


周錬の家を訪れると、一見して何と言うことのないインテリアに驚くべき仕掛けが隠されていて驚かされる。スイッチを入れると、アイランドキッチンの天井から、小さなライトがいくつも暖かい光を落とし、食卓の丸いペンダントライトが灯り、慌ただしい気持ちを落ち着かせてくれる。夜も深まると、照度を落として、柔らかい光に夜を楽しめる。

訪問客の驚きの嘆声を聞きながら、周錬の優雅な横顔には微かに得意げな表情が浮かび、さらに部屋のライティングデザインのあれこれを説明してくれる。

光の在処を感じる

周錬はしかし、談笑の中にあちこちと難しい専門用語を挟まむことはない。今年74歳の彼にとって、光とは感じるものである。光はワットやルーメン、色温度など、専門用語に存在するのではないという。

そういったセンスは、周錬の経歴からくるものだろうか。最難関の台湾大学に進んだ兄や姉とは異なり、三番目の周錬は小さい頃から勉強は不得意だった。中学高校と教科書は落書きばかりで、母は息子の学業を心配したが、父は故郷の寧波語で「心配しなくとも、いずれ落ち着く」と周錬の母を慰めた。

こういった自由で開放的な家庭にあって、伝統的な価値観の枠に縛られることなく、50数年前に周錬は国立芸術専科学校(現在の国立台湾芸術大学)美術学部彫塑科に進学した。1970年代にはアメリカに留学し、彫刻と共に映画を副専攻とし、その後、プラット・インスティテュートの計画環境センター(大学院)に学んだ。好奇心の赴くまま、美術の境界を越えて学んだジャンルだが、ライティングデザインの道に進んでからは、それが養分となった。

「彫塑からは創作に立ち向かう勇気、映画からはコミュニケーションを学び、施主の必要性を優先するデザインでは生産プロセスの有効管理を学びました」と周錬は語る。芸術と実務のバランスのとり方に習熟していたおかげで、照明デザインのジャンルで速やかに頭角を現すようになった。

1978年に再び学位取得のためにアメリカに留学し、夏休みには同級生と照明デザイン大手のBPIブランドストン・パートナーズ社でアルバイトをすることにした。ところが、わずか一日勤務しただけで上司はその才能を認め、正規社員を上回る高給で周錬をリクルートしたのである。その後、会社のプロジェクト・マネージャー会議で使われるプレゼンのファイルは、すべて周錬が作成することとなった。その優秀さを買われて、周錬はわずか4年でBPI社の平社員からデザイン部長に昇進し、続いて経営陣に加わり、最終的に会長にまで上り詰めた。

人を基準に環境対応

これまで30年余り、BPI社を率いてきた周錬は主に国際的な場で活動してきた。しかし、最近では招きに応じて台南県の風神廟、屏東県の恒春古城のライティングをデザインして、台湾に滞在する期間が増え、マスメディアに取り上げられるようになった。

新しいライティングを設置したことで、百年以上の歴史を誇る二つの古跡が新たに蘇った。多くの人は、彼のデザイン美学を「減光」と捉えているが、周錬はこれに反して照明デザインには従わなければならない原則はないという。台南と屏東で採用した減光だが、次回はこれとはまた別の手法を採用するかもしれない。

今年、北港朝天宮で行ったデザインは、確かに煌めくライトを多用している。色温度4000kのLEDライト300個近くを周囲に配置したため、夜になると闇に沈んでしまう朝天宮の屋根の精緻な装飾は、新しいライティングにより廟の前の通りからもマンションの上からも、その美を見られるようになった。こうして300年余りの歴史を誇る朝天宮の建築は、より立体的に華やかに見ることができるようになった。

周錬の手にかかると、光はかくも自在に操られるのだが、そのデザイン・プランは、すべて「人を基準に環境に呼応」を理念としている。周錬によると、ライティングデザインと言うと多くの人は照明技術と考えているが、人が光を感じる時、そこにはより多くの人の温もりが含まれるという。例えば子供時代の台風の夜、蝋燭を灯すと、淡い光に母の影が揺れたことがあった。この柔らかい光との偶然の出会いにより、母の姿が心に刻みつけられた。「光は単なる光ではなく、過去の記憶を内包しています」と、その言葉には光への洞察が含まれる。

台南の奇美博物館の主建築と展示スペースの照明デザインでも、出発点は同じである。周錬は、どうしたら建築の最良の面を表現できるのかと考えるのだが、その最良とは何なのだろう。「建築物を美しく照らすだけではなく、ハードの建築を越えて、文化社会的一面をデザインに盛り込みます」と周錬は語る。そこでデザインの主軸に台南人の誇りを据え、台南市民が夜に高速86号を走らせ、遠くに奇美博物館を眺めた時、誇りに感じられることを考えた。

恒春古城の再生においても、プラニングに際して幾つもの疑問が生じた。「現代の城は今でも城と言えるのか」「城壁は防御、門は閉鎖と開放の二側面があり、城門と人の生活は深く関っている」「建築物自身が生命を有する」とのコンセプトから周錬は収斂した減算のライティングを考えた。城門の通路に照明を置き、内を明るく外を暗くした視覚効果で、城門を通りながら故郷に戻る感覚を作り出した。夜が更けると、歴史ある城門も眠りにつき、わずかなライトが西門の額を照らすのみとした。

光から始まり、人を基準として、環境との関係を考察するというのが周錬のデザイン哲学で、そこには全体観が見て取れる。周錬のドラフト・ノートに、そのコンセプトが表されている。ノートに向かった彼は、これを相手側の向きに180度回し、慣れたタッチで逆向きに城門のデッサンを描き出した。その草木や煉瓦一つ一つと周囲の環境との視覚的必要性に合せて、ほかに動かしようのない確かな位置にライトを置いていく。こうした複雑な作業を見て、ある人がコンピュータを使わないのかと聞いてみたが、「その場に展開する光の環境は、ITの演算で調べられるものではありません」と答えた。

南から北へ、屏東、台南、雲林から台北の北門ロータリー、西区周辺道路計画、さらには2018年に台中で開催される2018台中世界花博覧会まで、そのすべての照明デザインに周錬が招聘されている。台湾のライティングデザインの新世代は、すべて周錬の影響を受けていると言われる。アメリカのライティングデザイン大手BPI社の会長職を退き、引退するはずだったのに、最近ではしばしば台湾での講演や講義のため、台湾に招かれている。一生をかけた照明デザインを、今度は台湾の若い世代に伝えようとしているのである。

そして、光について尋ねてみると、あたかも道を説くかのように答える。今は白髪となった周錬だが、若い頃に「老子道徳経」を愛読し、戦略を論じた「孫氏の兵法」や、宮本武蔵が剣の道を記した「五輪書」を座右に置いていた。その若い時代、人生の哲理や理念は分っていなかったかもしれないが、年月が過ぎ、生に流れ込んできたすべてを、周錬は光をもって表現している。             

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!