Practical Politics for You and Me

Participatory Budgeting
:::

2020 / June

Lynn Su /photos courtesy of Kent Chuang /tr. by Brandon Yen


Taiwanese citizens are fortunate because our constitution guarantees many civil liberties, including universal suffrage, freedom of speech and thought, the right to life, and the right to education, among others. Put into practice, this not only means that we are allowed to vote in elections, but the various rights which we enjoy also require that we—as responsible citizens—should proactively engage with public issues, reject trash talk and empty words, and take the initiative to act.


 

As members of society, we all understand that the world is not perfect, and that established systems are often less than satisfactory. We can take charge of our private affairs, but effecting social change is no easy task. However, since “parti­cip­atory budgeting” was introduced to Taiwan in 2015, we have been able to redress some of the defects of our representative democracy. This new system provides an ideal opportunity for every­one to get involved in politics.

Never too old to participate

“It’s all hot air!” You used to hear these words very often from elderly residents of Longtan Village in Yunlin County’s Dongshi Township. In that remote, predominantly rural com­mun­ity with its aging population, most people will probably be baffled if you talk to them about “civic engagement.” But when asked what they think of their community, they all have something to say.

Things were quite different there a few years ago. With the disappearance of the close-knit interpersonal networks that characterize traditional rural communities, old farmers went to work alone and then returned home alone to sit in front of their televisions, day in, day out. Some of those who lived alone even died alone, their bodies not being dis­covered until several days after they had passed away.

The involvement of the Yunlin County Participatory Democracy Association has brought significant changes to this community. Devoted to the promotion of grassroots demo­cracy, youngsters like Wang Jyun-kai, Wu Song-lin and Hsu Wei-ching have been collaborating with Yunlin Favorlang River Community College, which has obtained funding from the Ministry of Education’s “Learning Cities” project. They have gradually obtained the support of the village chief and of members of Longtan’s community development association in order, slowly but steadily, to make changes happen in the village, which had so long been in decline.

But mobilizing the villagers has turned out to be a herculean task. Past experience showed that you could at best expect two or three people to turn up at meetings to discuss communal matters. These meetings inevitably came to nothing. In order to encourage more villagers to par­ti­cip­ate, the village chief went to great lengths, visiting every household to listen to opinions and to invite every­one to attend public meetings.

Although the budget available to the villagers amounted to just NT$100,000, a consensus was reached during a meeting that a community kitchen needed to be established, something that many residents had long hoped for. “The idea of a com­mun­ity kitchen is not just to ensure that there’s good food for old people; it’s also to ensure that we can see them every day.” Village chief ­Huang Shi­yuan is very much aware that even more than protecting the physical health of elderly people, it is vitally important to forge stronger ties between the villagers so as to establish interpersonal networks that can provide mutual care and support within this ageing community. “I call this ‘a connection of love.’”

Participatory budgeting in Taiwan

Longtan’s elderly villagers were not unfamiliar with meetings and discussions, but experience told them that residents’ assemblies always turned out to be more about form than substance. They therefore came to view these occasions as producing nothing but “hot air.”

It was precisely to address problems of this kind that participatory budgeting—which puts into practice the idea that “my budget is for me to decide”—came into being. First seen in Brazil’s Porto Alegre in 1988, participatory budgeting was originally intended to redress deficiencies in representative democracy. In addition to attending more closely to the needs of the people, the system aims to better care for underprivileged citizens by redistributing public resources.

Participatory budgeting has been practiced in other countries for more than 30 years. It is relatively new to Taiwan: not until the 2014 local elections was the idea floated and debated by Taipei City mayoral candidates Ko Wen-je and Sean Lien. It has since developed into the two mainstream models we see today.

Headed by government agencies, the first model allows agency chiefs to allot part of their budgets to promote projects within their remits. At the local level, this model is represented by the cities of Taipei, Taichung and Taoyuan. At the national level, a prominent example is the Ministry of Culture’s “Community Development 2.0” initiative.

The second model of participatory budgeting centers on local councilors, who can allot money from the government funds that are at their discretion. Because it originates in Chicago, where a similar system of discretionary funds is operated, this is called the “Chicago Model.”

Starting with civic engagement

Chen Yi-chun was the first councilor in Taiwan to try her hand at participatory budgeting. Hitherto, the main way councilors serve their constituents has been that individuals visit councilors to ask for help with their problems, which councilors then handle on a case-by-case basis. By contrast, what participatory budgeting emphasizes is proactive civic engagement. Chen says: “Citizens take the initiative to come forward and discuss changes they want to make. Far from being confined to specific individuals, the impact will be collective. We join forces to make our dreams come true.”

In 2015, Chen began an experiment with the community she was serving, Daguan in Taipei City’s Xindian District, and allocated the small amount of NT$600,000 for local use. Over the past few years, this has risen to NT$5 million, and the local residents have been encouraged to put forward their proposals.

The practice of participatory budgeting has made residents realize that “politics” is actually not something beyond their reach. Those mothers who bring their children to play in the local park used to do little more than grumble to each other about the cookie-­cutter plastic playground equipment. But they have now teamed up with “Taiwan Parks & Playgrounds for Children by Children” to design their own bespoke playground facilities, thus transforming the com­mun­ity’s antiquated park into an inclusive modern space with a lot of character that suits young and old alike.

Is there anywhere you think your local government falls short? Can you suggest ways to make improvements? Come and have your say through participatory budgeting—do your part as an active citizen and reap the rewards!

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

日本語 繁體

より良い社会を目指して

誰もが参政できる「市民参加型予算」

文・蘇俐穎 写真・莊坤儒 翻訳・山口 雪菜

幸運なことに、私たちは憲法によって参政権や思想・言論の自由、生存権、教育を受ける権利などを保障されている。では選挙の時に一票を投じるほかに、どのように公民としての価値を発揮できるのだろう。公共の議題に関心を寄せ、実際に行動を起こすことである。


社会の一員である私たちは、世界が完璧ではないことを知っている。さまざまな制度も決して理想的とは言えない。プライベートなことは自分で決められるが、社会を変えるのは容易なことではない。だが台湾では2015年に海外から現行の代議制民主主義の不足を補う「市民参加型予算」が導入され、これが一般の人々に政治に参加する道を開いている。

年をとっても参画できる

雲林県龍潭地域の年配者たちは、いつも「話しているだけでは何も始まらない」と言う。高齢化が進む地方の農村で「住民参加」と言っても、多くの人はうまく説明できないが、地域の将来について尋ねると、誰もが自分の考えを話し始める。

しかし、数年前まではこうではなかった。農家同士の昔ながらの人間関係は薄れ、畑仕事を終えるとそれぞれが家に帰ってテレビを見るという日々の繰り返しで、独り暮らしのお年寄りの「孤独死」も起きていた。

そこへ「雲林県参加型民主協会」が入ってきたことで地域は大きく変わった。「草の根の民主主義」を推進する王俊凱、呉松霖、徐薇清ら若者たちは虎尾渓コミュニティカレッジと協力し、カレッジが教育部から受けた「学習型都市」プラン補助金をもって、村長や地域発展協会などの住民代表の支持を取り付けた。これによって暗く沈んでいた農村が少しずつ変わってきたのである。

「これこそ私が求めていたものではないか」と初めて参加型予算の概念に触れた村長の黄詩媛は思ったという。「それは村民全員が村長になることです」

しかし、住民を動かすと言っても容易なことではない。従来の経験では公の物事を決める集会を開いても数人しか集まらず、何も決められないことがほとんどだ。そこで住民に来てもらうために村長は一軒一軒訪ね歩き、住民の声を聞き、参加を促した。

住民が自由に使える予算はわずか10万元だが、話し合いで決定したのは、高齢者のための住民食堂を開くことだった。「これは高齢者に良いものを食べてもらうだけでなく、毎日顔を見ることが狙いです」と村長の黄詩媛は言う。高齢者の健康を守るとともに、住民同士のつながりを取り戻し、高齢化が進んだ地域に人のネットワークをつくることだ。「私はこれを『愛の絆』と定義しています」

台湾の「参加型予算」

「今は若者だけでなく、農村の高齢者も引きこもっていますから」と住民の黄堃栄は言う。住民食堂の自治委員を務める彼は、行動の不自由なお年寄りの送迎を買って出ている。

こうして村民の公民意識は高まり、昔のように陰で不満を言うのではなく、行動をもって地域を良くしようと考えるようになった。協会が提供してくれた費用はすでに使い切ったが、村民たちは資金や労力を出し合って続けている。「龍潭地域は変りましたよ」と言う。

台湾の参加型予算

集まっての話し合いはこれまでも行なってきたが、住民集会なども形式的なものになることが多く、結局「話しているだけでは何も始まらない」というのが皆の結論だった。

それが「住民に予算の使い方を決める権利がある」という参加型予算が実現したことで、こうした問題を解決できるようになった。ブラジルのポルト・アレグレで始まった市民参加型予算は、当初は代議制の不足を補うのが目的だった。市民のニーズにより近い形でリソースを再分配し、弱者をケアしようというものである。

参加型予算は海外では30年にわたって行われており、台湾では2014年の台北市長選挙の際に、候補者の柯文哲と連勝文が政見として打ち出した。今日、台湾では主に二つのモデルで行われている。

一つは行政部門が中心となり、首長が予算の一部を拠出して計画として推進するもの。現在自治体では台北市、台中市、桃園市などで行われており、中央では文化部(文化省)「社造2.0」などがある。もう一つは地方の議員が中心となり、議員に配分された枠予算を拠出するというものだ。米国シカゴと同様の方法であるため、シカゴモデルとも呼ばれる。

台湾の参加型予算は百花斉放の状態で、背景も方法も成果もさまざまだ。桃園市で推進された「東南アジア移住労働者のレジャー」をテーマとした計画では各国出身の労働者を集めて討論するという方法を採り、世界的にも注目された。

「参加型予算を推進するにはさまざまな条件が整うことが必要です」と話すのは、台湾で初めて参加型予算を推進した中山大学社会学科の萬毓澤教授だ。資金源と規定の行政手続が必要だが、中でも重要なのはプロセスにおいて質の高い公共討論が行われることだと言う。

台湾で初めて参加型予算を試みたのは議員の陳儀君だ。従来の議員によるサービスと言えば、陳情への対応が挙げられるが、参加型予算では市民の能動的な参画が強調される。「どのような変革が必要なのか、住民が能動的に理解することが重要で、一人ではなく多くの人が一緒に夢を作り上げるのです」と陳儀君は言う。

長年にわたって議員を務めてきた彼女だが、現行の制度では行き届かない部分があり、また問題を提起して行政部門が執行する際も、実際には困難に直面することもある。だからこそ参加型予算を試みようと考えたのである。これを一つの実験の場として、市民の立場から考え、陳情者(提案者)が直接公的部門とコミュニケーションをとれるようにし、官民協力で双方にとって有利な結果を出したいと考えている。

市民の生活に密着

陳儀君は2015年から自分の選挙区である新北市新店区の達観里で60万元という少額から参加型予算を開始した。現在では500万元まで増やし、市民からの提案を受け付けている。

参加型予算というモデルがなければ、市民は自分が「政治」とこれほど近いものだとは気づかないだろう。例えば、公園で子供を遊ばせている母親たちも、集まってプラスチックの陳腐な遊具に不満を言うだけだった。それが今では「特色ある公園を求める行動連盟」と協力し、それぞれの公園にふさわしい遊具が設置されるようになり、古い公園が特色ある公園へと生まれ変わった。

あなたも市政に不満な点はないだろうか。あるいは良い改善策はないだろうか。一緒に「参加型予算」に加わり、公民としての価値を最大限に発揮してみてはいかがだろう。

素人參政第一堂 公民應用題

參與式預算

文‧蘇俐穎 圖‧莊坤儒

何其幸運,憲法保障我們享有參政、思想及言論自由、生存及受教育等種種權利。落實在生活裡,除了選舉時擁有神聖的一票,平日如何持續發揮作為公民的最高價值?主動關心公共議題,不嘴砲、不紙上談兵,付諸實際行動,是好公民必備的應用題。


作為社會的一份子,我們都明白,世界並不完美;制度,也常不盡如人意,私人的事可以自己作主,但改變社會,又談何容易?但台灣從2015年,從國外引入「參與式預算」,彌補了現行代議民主制度的闕漏,成為素人參政的絕佳管道。

活到老,參與到老

「說這麼多也沒用!」這是雲林龍潭社區的長輩過去最常說的一句話。在這個以農業為主、老化嚴重的偏鄉,談「公民參與」,多數居民懵懵懂懂,但問到對社區有什麼樣的想像?人人都能談上幾句。

回溯到幾年前,完全不是這樣。傳統農家緊密的人際網絡已不復見,老農下田,收工後各自回家,守著一台電視機,日復一日,甚至曾發生過幾次「孤獨死」事件:獨居老人在家過世,卻事隔多日才被發現……。

「雲林縣參與式民主協會」的進駐,為社區帶來了改變。致力推動「草根民主」的王俊凱、吳松霖、徐薇清等年輕人,與虎尾溪社區大學合作,帶著由社大所爭取到的教育部「學習型城市」計畫經費,逐步取得村長、社區發展協會等村民代表的支持,讓一向死氣沉沉的村庄一點一滴地發生了變化。

「這不就是我想要的嗎?」第一次接觸到參與式預算的概念,就被說服的村長黃詩媛,心領神會地提出了一句口號:「『參與式預算』就是村民作伙當村長!」

但想說動居民,實在不容易。有鑑於以往經驗,牽涉到公共事務的集會,到場都只有小貓兩、三隻,最後以不了了之收場。為把村民請出家門,村長不厭其煩地挨家挨戶拜訪,聆聽村民心聲,邀請與會。

雖然能讓村民自由運用經費不過少少10萬元,經過集體討論,大夥兒達成共識,決定推動村民盼望了許久的共餐。「共餐,並不光是為了讓老人家吃得好,而是為了每天都要看到他。」村長黃詩媛相當明白,除了守護長輩的健康,更重要的是活絡居民日久生疏的感情,藉此為高齡化的社區打造出一套可相互照應的人際網絡,「我把這定義為『愛的連結』。」

「別說年輕人都是『宅男宅女』,農村裡多的是『宅阿公、宅阿嬤』。」村民黃堃榮形容。擔任共餐自治委員的他,負責接送村中行動不便的老人家。

就像他一樣,經過培力,萌發公民意識的村民,如今也能明白,與其像過去封閉、私下逞口舌之快地批評,倒不如付諸行動,以「希望社區越來越好」的願念把想法實踐出來。雖然協會帶來的經費早已用罄,但村民自發性持續出錢出力,能夠自豪地說:「龍潭社區,和以前真的不一樣!」

參與式預算在台灣

開會、討論,龍潭社區的長輩並不陌生,但過去像舉辦過里民大會,經驗總告訴他們,形式大於意義,最後得到了心得:「說再多也沒用!」

真正落實「我的預算,我有權決定」的參與式預算,就是為了解決這樣的問題而產生的。首見於巴西愉港(Porto Alegre)的參與式預算,原初的用意就是為了改善代議式民主的缺陷,除了貼近民眾需求,也可望藉此資源的重新分配,照顧到弱勢族群。

參與式預算在國外發展超過30年,台灣稍晚,直到2014年的九合一大選,才由台北市市長候選人柯文哲、連勝文陸續提出相關政見,發展至今日形成了兩種主流模式。

其一,是以政府部門為首,仰賴首長意志,提撥出部分的預算,以計畫的形式來推動。地方政府以台北、台中、桃園為代表;中央單位則如文化部的「社造2.0」。第二種,是以地方議員為主,由議員從個人所能支出的配合款中撥出經費,因為源自於同樣有配合款制度的芝加哥,故又被稱「芝加哥模式」。

參與式預算制度在台灣,案例百花齊放,背景不同、作法不同,成果良莠不一,但值得一書的是,在多元族群的台灣,桃園市府曾推動以「東南亞移工休閒育樂」為主題的計畫,廣邀各國移工齊聚一堂進行討論,因而成為國際上知名的代表性案例。

「(想推動參與式預算)需要很多條件支持。」台灣首批開始推動參與式預算的學者、中山大學社會系教授萬毓澤說明。他認為,除了找到經費來源,跑完既定流程,更重要的是過程中「可以捲動在地高品質的公共討論。」

以他親自在高雄哈瑪星社區推動的經驗來說,除了多次舉辦工作坊,更廣邀社區居民參與,討論現場逐桌分配審議員與會議紀錄在場,除了記錄下會議過程,經過培訓的審議員,會搭配議事技巧協助民眾進入討論,進一步確保討論品質。

從人民的生活出發

台灣首位率先嘗試參與式預算的議員是陳儀君。過往議員的服務方式,是由陳情人登門請託,再逐件服務,但參與式預算,強調的是公民的主動投入,「由民眾主動了解,想做什麼樣的改變;擾動的不會只是一個人,而是一群人,由大家一起來完成夢想。」陳儀君說。

已經從政多年,一直在市民與市府之間擔任橋梁的她,坦言道,服務得再勤懇,在現行制度之下,總還是會有疏漏沒照顧到的角落;再加上,即便點出問題,交由行政部門實際執行,也可能會遇到窒礙難行之處。這也是她選擇參與式預算的動機,希望另闢實驗場域,由民眾的角度出發,讓陳情人(提案人)直接與跨局處的政府官員當面溝通,達到官民合作的雙贏。

2015年開始,她由自己所服務的新店區達觀里開始做起,撥出小額的60萬元開始試辦。近年提高到500萬,邀請民眾提案。

若非有參與式預算的設計,公民不曉得,自己原來離「政治」的距離那樣近。在公園裡蹓小孩的媽媽們,不過就是齊聚一塊,抱怨著乏善可陳的塑膠罐頭遊具,但現在,她們與「還我特色公園行動聯盟」(簡稱特公盟)合作,量身設計遊具,讓社區裡的老公園翻身,成為富特色且老少皆宜的共融公園。

也有「台灣自然科技學會」提案的「碧潭和美山賞螢生態石板步道」,藉參與式預算順利購買到石板建材,提案單位謹守生態保育的原則,構築起一條既不干擾到螢火蟲棲地,同時也可賞螢的「手工」步道,復育後的山景,是深受市民喜愛的遊憩景點。

而你對市政是否也有不滿的地方?有什麼改善的好方法?一同來玩「參與式預算」,發揮公民的最大價值! 

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!