In Search of the Formosan Sambar

:::

2017 / October

Ivan Chen /photos courtesy of Yen Shih-ching /tr. by Robert Green


Imagine a mountain without its animals—even with the beauty of the landscape intact, it would be like a mountain without a soul. The Formosan sambar deer, which lives in the high mountains, is Taiwan’s largest herbivore, and it was once driven to the verge of extinction by hunting and the destruction of its natural habitat. The success of conservation efforts has reversed this trend in recent years, and the population is expanding. Because the sambar has no natural enemies, however, new challenges have gradually become apparent. The past and future of this iconic species should prompt us to think deeply about the close relationship between mankind and the environment, especially the high mountain environment.


As its economy began to flourish in the early 1980s, Taiwan was more able to focus on wildlife conservation. “The establishment of Ken­ting National Park in 1984 was a milestone,” says Wang Ying, a professor in National Taiwan Normal University’s School of Life Science. “We finally had an official agency and a geographic location for protecting Taiwan’s wildlife.”

The birth of the Wildlife Conservation Act

Wang took part in the drafting of the 1989 Wildlife Conservation Act. At that time, the Convention on Biological Diversity (a treaty signed at the 1992 Rio Earth Summit) was being widely discussed, and the international community was taking a greater interest in local wildlife and local communities, especially the rights and traditional practices of indigenous peoples.

After the Wildlife Conservation Act took effect, discussion turned to which species were endangered and most in need of attention. Taiwan’s largest herbivore, the sambar, was extremely rare at that time. Mountain walkers and climbers described catching sight of the deer as akin to winning the lottery, a rare piece of luck indeed. This sparked the interest of Wang Ying, who was already conducting research on wildlife conservation.

Wild sambar on the brink

In the past, deer breeding farms required a supply of wild sambar for their genetic input. To meet this demand, Aborigines set out to capture them. “In those days, a large sambar could fetch as much as most people’s annual earnings,” Wang says.

Overhunting driven by the sambar’s high commercial value led to rapid depletion of the population.

A research team led by Wang conducted a survey of the commercial consumption of sambar in 1986‡1987, and found that sambar meat was in short supply in restaurants serving mountain game dishes. Moreover, a tuberculosis outbreak at deer farms in 1989‡1990 caused the population of wild sambar to plummet, making a bad situation even worse. “While the population of Reeves’ muntjac deer numbered in the tens of thousands, sambar could be counted in the hundreds,” Wang says. “It is no easy task to revive a population that has dwindled to such an extent.”

A research milestone

Yen Shih-ching, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Animal Science and Technology at National Taiwan University, recalls his first experience capturing a sambar. Lugging two nets, each weighing nearly 20 kilo­grams, the research team, with two Aboriginal hunters as guides, climbed into the mountains. On the first day it rained, and carrying the wet gear alone was exhausting. After two days of hiking, they reached the western peak of Mt. Panshi and set up camp in a spot called “Exclamation Pond,” a small valley-shaped depression that resembles an exclamation mark when the water level is low. After setting the nets, all the men in the party had to urinate on them, because human urine attracts the sambar.

During the day they practiced strategies to drive a sambar into the nets, if one should appear nearby. The tent was about 20 meters from the nets, and when all was ready, the team waited for a sambar to walk into their trap. Suddenly they heard a noise outside. “Quick! Get the tranquilizers ready.”

Yen and another researcher charged from opposite directions. Shouting and turning on lamps, they made the animal turn and bolt directly into the nets.

Once the net closed around the sambar, the other team members held down the netting, then the vet quickly tranquilized it. After about ten minutes, the tranquilizer took effect, and they could finally open the net. At that point, some of the stronger members of the team rushed ­forward. One bound the hind legs, another bound the front legs, and yet another secured the head. Tennis balls were used to cover the antler tips to avoid injuries. Next the sambar was weighed, and the vet drew blood, collected samples of body parasites, measured the deer’s height, length, and neck circumference, and fitted the animal with a transmitter collar. When the team was finished, the vet injected the animal again to revive it, and it was released back into the wild. It was July 15, 2009, when Wang and Yen led the first research team to successfully capture a sambar and fit a tracker on it. It can be counted as a milestone in the quest to track and study the Formosan sambar.

Trouble on the mountain

Of course research can’t proceed so smoothly every time. One night the skies opened and rain came pouring down. The tent was pitched in a small ravine with rock walls on both sides, and the sambar trap was situated off to the side. After sleeping for a bit, Yen got up to get a drink of water. He discovered that the tent’s groundsheet was soft and squelchy underfoot, and quickly looked outside. To his dismay, he saw that slippers, metal cups, and pans were all afloat. After scrambling to wake the rest of the team, they moved everything to higher ground. They then assumed that their troubles were over, but after sleeping a couple more hours, they found that the flood waters had risen again. For the rest of the night the team was forced to move again and again. It continued to pour outside, and inside the tent everyone was soaked to the bone despite their rain gear. Meanwhile a group of sambar looked on as if watching a comedy as Yen and his team scrambled about, spending a miserable night.   

Emerging environmental concerns

The success of conservation efforts in recent years has led to exponential growth in the sambar population, and with no natural enemies, the deer have begun to negatively impact the forests. This has been especially noticeable in high-elevation coniferous forests. Recent incidents of large-scale tree loss have occurred primarily in forests of fir and Taiwan hemlock trees. Yu­shan National Park has been particularly hard hit.

According to the preliminary findings of a research team led by Weng Guo-jing, associate professor at ­National Ping­tung University of Science and Techno­logy’s Institute of Wildlife Conservation, parasites are more prevalent in sambar droppings collected in some areas of Yu­shan. After measuring levels of condensed tannins in the droppings and in samples of tree bark and of Yu­shan cane (Yushania niitakayamensis), the bamboo species that is the sambar’s main food, taken from various areas where the deer feed, the researchers discovered that while the barks of different trees had differing levels of tannins, the substance was undetectable in the bamboo. The tannins can help kill parasites in the digestive tract, and this medicinal benefit might explain why the deer strip tree bark. Research is ongoing, and we will have to wait for more conclusive results to confirm whether this “self-medication” hypothesis holds water.

While research is raising some worrying questions, it is also delivering some good news. Sun Li-jhu, head of the Conservation and Research Section at Ta­roko National Park, points out that data resulting from four years of cross-regional monitoring and the collection of more than a thousand excrement samples indicates that Taiwan’s sambar population can be divided into two major groups—the sambar found in the area of Taroko and Shei-Pa national parks, and those of the Central Mountain Range. The division resulted from habitat changes some 100,000 years ago, as alpine glaciers receded and snow­lines rose following an ice age. This is a major discovery and gives us a better understanding of the sambar family.

Balancing ecology, economy, and conservation

“Thirty years ago,” Wang Ying notes, “we talked of preservation rather than conservation. At the time, the United States was dealing with animals on the verge of extinction, and therefore they sought to ‘preserve’ them. Only after an animal’s population grew did they switch to ‘conserving’ them.”

Wang feels that the term “conservation” is best used to describe the management of an animal population after it has been protected and has regained the ability to breed successfully. Once its population has recovered, it can also be exploited economically. Yen points to the case of sika deer in Japan. About a century ago, the sika had nearly gone extinct in Japan due to overhunting, and because of their scarcity hunting was prohibited. But not long after the hunting ban, the sika’s natural predator, the Japanese wolf, was itself hunted to extinction. Subsequently the sika population flourished, growing exponentially. As a result, hunting was once again permitted, and today in Hok­kaido 80,000 sika are culled each year. The deer population, however, remains too large, and the animals cause considerable damage to farms and forests. 

The situation of the sambar in Taiwan today resembles that of the sika in Japan a half-century ago. Wang thinks that the increase in the species’ population thanks to conservation can pave the way for ecotourism, which allows people to appreciate the sambar firsthand, cultivates a reverence for the animal’s natural habitat, and raises popular awareness of ecological conservation in general. The population growth should also allow for the establishment of designated areas in which Aborigines can hunt. This would help limit sambar numbers to a suitable level and reduce environmental degradation. It would also help preserve traditional Aboriginal hunting rituals and the dignity of hunting culture by preserving time-honored ancestral hunting techniques. Moreover, it would enable the sambar deer to act as a bridge linking ecology, conservation, and economic needs.        

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

水鹿現蹤

台灣保育研究最前線

文‧陳亮君 圖‧顏士清

想像如果山上沒有動物,就算景色再秀麗,這座山等於就沒了靈魂。水鹿是台灣高山上最大型的草食獸,曾經因棲地破壞與濫捕,一度瀕臨滅絕。近年來由於保育有成,數量正不斷增加當中,但由於沒有天敵,隨之而來的問題也逐漸浮現。水鹿的出現,把人跟環境,尤其是高山環境緊密連結在一起,也是值得讓我們省思的指標性物種。


從小就對動物充滿好奇的臺灣師範大學生命科學系教授王穎,以及喜愛登山,對大型動物沒有抵抗力的台灣大學動物科學技術學系博士後研究員顏士清,一位是數十年研究野生動物的權威,另一位則是年輕研究員,在水鹿研究的過程中,有辛酸、有感動,更是肩負起保育的重責大任。

《野生動物保育法》的催生

80年代初期,台灣經濟開始發展,逐漸有能力來關注野生動物的保育。王穎述及早期台灣的保育情況:「1984年墾丁國家公園的成立是一個標竿,我們終於有正式的機構與地方來保育台灣的野生動物。」此外,王穎還參與了1989年《野生動物保育法》草案的擬定,那段期間,正值世界生物多樣性公約的廣泛討論,國際上逐漸重視在地野生動物的資源,以及關注在地居民,尤其是原住民的權益與傳統智慧。

《野生動物保育法》實施之後,就開始討論哪些物種是瀕臨滅絕,需要被關注。而台灣最大型的草食動物──水鹿,在當時數量非常稀少,許多登山客形容如果能看到水鹿,就像中彩券一樣,實是可遇不可求,這吸引了當時從事野生動物研究的王穎注意,「早期看到水鹿都是驚鴻一瞥,看到等於中獎,興奮得不得了。2000年左右,在磐石奇萊北峰這邊,那地方因為登山人少,獵人更是沒有,才有機會跟水鹿有距離一公尺的接觸。」王穎憶起早期看到水鹿的情形。

野生水鹿幾近瀕危

早期養殖業希望野外的種源能夠進入繁殖場,因為有此需求,所以常有原住民抓水鹿賣給鹿場,「當時一隻大的水鹿,有時等於很多人一整年的薪水。」王穎說。由於過度的獵捕,以及棲地遭受破壞,讓水鹿數量急速萎縮。

此外,1986-1987年由王穎主持的研究團隊,在全國做野生動物資源的利用調查,同樣發現山產店水鹿的使用量非常稀少。加上1989-1990年那段期間,養殖鹿場爆發肺結核感染,讓已經稀有的野生水鹿,更是雪上加霜。王穎提到當時情形:「山羌可能數以萬計,水鹿就可能幾百。當族群數量一旦壓得很低的時候,要恢復是很不容易的事。」

水鹿追蹤研究里程碑

顏士清回憶起第一次捕捉水鹿的情景。「第一次抓水鹿,一切都是陌生,但有請兩個原住民上來指導。」顏士清說。那時揹了兩個快20公斤的網子上去,第一天就下雨,「網子怎麼越揹越重……」其中一位原住民向顏士清抱怨,原來網子的重量加上雨水,光是負重行走就很吃力。走了兩天,到達磐石西峰一個叫驚嘆號池的營地,那是一個小凹谷的地形。把網子圍起後,規定所有男生要在此排尿,因為人類的尿液能夠吸引水鹿過來。

白天時演練,網子中間或附近出現水鹿時,要怎麼分頭驅趕至網內,帳篷離網大約20公尺,在一切準備就緒後,就等水鹿自投羅網。雖是夏夜,但高山氣候依舊寒冷,突然,外面傳來一聲:「快!準備麻醉器材。」顏士清跟另外一位研究同仁從兩側衝上去,一邊大喊一邊開燈,讓牠轉身往回跑,就會撞上網子。

網子一蓋下來,旁邊的人要先壓住網子,接著獸醫馬上過來麻醉,待十多分鐘麻醉見效後,才將網子拆開。這時幾名捕捉組壯丁同時衝上,一人負責綁住後腳,一人負責前腳,一人負責頭部等物理保定,鹿角同時也套上網球以免傷人。接下來就是吊起來量體重、獸醫採血、採體外寄生蟲,以及測量肩高、體長、頸圍,放無線電項圈……等等,所有操作完成後,獸醫才注射解藥,原地釋放。那是2009年7月15日,王穎與顏士清所率領的研究團隊第一次成功捕捉水鹿並繫上項圈,堪稱是台灣水鹿追蹤研究的里程碑。

山上研究狀況多

研究當然不可能每次都這麼順利,有天晚上,突然傾盆大雨。帳篷搭的地方剛好是一個谷地,兩邊是山坡,捕捉水鹿的陷阱就在旁邊。顏士清睡了一會想說起身喝水,結果發現帳篷底下軟軟的,急忙打開帳篷一看,不得了,拖鞋、鋼杯、鍋子全都浮了起來。趕緊把大家叫醒後,將東西搬上更高的地方,想說這樣就應該沒問題了。再睡了一兩小時後,又淹了上來,整個晚上,反覆搬了數次之多。外頭依舊下著大雨,裡頭每個人就算穿了雨衣,也全身濕透,帳篷外還有一群水鹿像看好戲似的,瞧著顏士清一群人搬來搬去,就這樣折騰了一夜。

事情還沒結束,當團隊撤退到一個叫月形池的地方,當晚風強雨驟,連帳篷都搭不起來。臨時跟另一研究團隊借了帳篷後,6人就擠進只搭了外帳的帳篷裡,過沒多久,墊在帳篷下雨布的水又淹了起來。顏士清的學弟問了當時隨行的一位原住民老獵人說:「Dama Lingav!你覺得我們要不要換地方啊,這裡好像又要淹了。」

Dama Lingav就說了一個故事,以前族裡老人家說,有一次去打獵,也是碰到這種天氣,也是淹水,其中一群人決定要換地方,另一群人則留在原地,結果出去的那一群人全部都死掉了。「喔……好,這樣我們就不要移。」顏士清等人面面相覷,最後在帳篷內挖了疏通水道,就這樣6人窩在一角,度過這漫漫長夜。

除了意外,也發生了些有趣的事情。因為每隻水鹿個性不同,為了稱呼方便,研究團隊也會幫牠們取名。如顏士清就稱呼其中一隻為「好奇哥」,牠是一隻大公鹿,完全不怕人。在研究期間一直在營地晃來晃去,就算經過捕捉並繫上項圈,隔天又回到營地來看研究人員在做什麼;另一隻叫「機靈哥」,牠每次進到網內吃好料,只要營地一有風吹草動,就馬上跑出去。隔沒多久又進來,連續數次,讓研究人員疲於奔命。後來機靈哥的鹿角纏到網子,拖著網子跑得不見鹿影,在動員人力遍尋不著後,隔日才又出現。

對環境隱憂逐漸浮現

近年來隨著水鹿保育有成,族群數量也開始呈現成長,在沒有天敵的情況下,對林業的負面衝擊已漸漸浮現。尤其是高海拔地區的針葉樹林,目前發生樹木大規模死亡的事件多半發生在冷杉林或鐵杉林,而且在玉山國家公園特別嚴重。

屏東科技大學野生動物保育研究所副教授翁國精的研究團隊,根據目前的研究證據指出,玉山的幾個樣區中,水鹿排遺裡的寄生蟲盛行率的確比其他地區較高;檢驗樹皮與水鹿於各地區所食箭竹的縮合單寧含量後發現,不同樹皮的縮合單寧含量各有不同,但是在箭竹中則完全沒有檢出,而縮合單寧能幫助殺死腸胃道內的寄生蟲。所以有可能是因為健康的因素,使得牠們必須啃食樹皮。不過目前研究還在持續進行中,待後續實驗全部完成後,才能確認這「自我醫療假說」是否成立。

除了負面的隱憂,也有正向的研究成果,太魯閣國家公園管理處保育課課長孫麗珠指出,當初會對水鹿做研究,主要是想更了解太魯閣國家公園區內水鹿的生態資訊。在經過4年的跨地域整合監測,抽取逾千份水鹿排遺基因樣本後,推論出台灣水鹿因受10萬年前高山冰河、雪線屏障影響,水鹿可分為「太魯閣雪霸」及「中央山脈」等兩大類群,這是一項重大的新發現,也讓國人對水鹿家族有更多認識。

生態、經濟與保育平衡

關於「保育」兩個字,王穎提到:「三十多年前我把Conservation翻成保育,而不是保護,因為美國當時也是歷經動物快要絕跡,所以他們開始保護,叫Preserve,等到動物多了,才改成Conserve。」他認為保育的意思是,保護之後讓牠能夠孕育,孕育多了之後,就要利用。顏士清則舉日本梅花鹿為例,大概一百多年前日本梅花鹿是瀕臨滅絕的,因為當時狩獵量太大,後來因為數量太少而禁獵。禁獵沒多久,梅花鹿的天敵──日本狼也因為人類大量的獵殺而滅絕。之後梅花鹿越來越多,呈現指數性的成長。後來開放狩獵,現在北海道一年要獵8萬隻梅花鹿,可是鹿群數量還是太多,造成農業與森林的很大損失。

現在台灣水鹿的情況很接近50年前的日本。王穎認為,隨著保育物種數量的提升,一方面可作為生態旅遊,讓民眾跟牠接近、欣賞牠,進而培養民眾對於水鹿居住環境的愛護,與整體生態保育的認知。另一方面則開放特定區域讓原住民來狩獵,既可維持適當的數量,降低對環境所造成的傷害,又可滿足原住民傳統狩獵的祭儀,以及他們打獵的尊嚴,來維持狩獵系統的技術與傳承,讓水鹿成為連結生態、經濟與保育的橋梁。

高山にサンバーを追う ——台湾の野生動物保全の最前線

文・陳亮君 写真・顏士清提供 翻訳・山口 雪菜

もし山に動物がいなければ、その景観がいかに美しくても、その山は魂を持たないに等しい。サンバー(水鹿/スイロク)は台湾の高山における最大の草食動物で、かつて棲息地の破壊と乱獲のために、一度は絶滅の危機に瀕していた。その後の保護が功を奏し、今では数は増え続けているが、天敵がいないため別の問題も生じ始めている。サンバーの存在は、人と環境、特に高山の環境と緊密に結びついており、さまざまな問題を考えさせる指標となる生物種なのである。


子供の頃から動物が大好きだった台湾師範大学生命科学科の王穎教授、そして登山と大型動物をこよなく愛する台湾大学動物科学技術学科ポストドクターの顔士清。一方は十数年にわたって野生動物を研究してきた学界の権威、もう一方は若い研究者、この二人はサンバー(水鹿)研究の過程で困難や喜びを体験し、その保全において重要な役割を担ってきた。

「野生動物保育法」成立のために

80年代の初め、台湾経済は発達し、しだいに野生動物の保護に関心が注がれるようになった。王؟oは当時の状況を次のように記している。「1984年の墾丁国立公園の設立がマイルストーンとなり、台湾でもようやく正式な機関による野生生物保全がスタートした」と。王穎は1989年に「野生動物保育法」の草案策定に加わったが、その頃はちょうど、世界でも生物多様性条約に関する議論が盛んになっており、地域住民、特に先住民族の権利と伝統の知恵が注目されていた。

「野生生物保育法」が施行されると、保護の必要な絶滅の危機に瀕した生物種についての討論が始まった。当時、台湾最大の草食動物であるサンバーの数は非常に少なく、登山愛好家の間では、サンバーに出会える確立は宝くじに当たるのと同じぐらい低いと言われていて、野生動物を研究していた王穎の注意を引いた。「当時はサンバーの姿を見る機会は本当に貴重でした。2000年の頃、奇莱北峰でサンバーに1メートルの距離まで接近したことがあります」と王؟oは語る。

絶滅に瀕した野生のサンバー

当初は、これを人工繁殖しようと考える鹿牧場もあり、先住民がサンバーを捕らえて牧場に売ることもあった。当時、サンバー1頭の価格は普通の人の年収にも相当したと王穎は言う。こうして乱獲と棲息地の破壊が進み、サンバーの数は急速に減少していった。

1986〜87年、王穎は全国の野生動物資源利用状況を調査したが、野生の鳥獣を提供する飲食店でもサンバーの食用は非常に少なかった。1989〜90年には鹿牧場で肺結核が流行し、すでに希少となっていたサンバーの数はさらに減少した。「同じシカ科のキョンは万単位の数でしたが、サンバーは数百頭を残すのみで、数が激減した後の回復は非常に難しいのです」

顔士清は初めてサンバーを捕らえた時の情景を思い出す。学者や研究生たちが、経験豊富な先住民2人の指導を受けながら重さ20キロの網を持って山に入り、雨の中、2日間歩いて盤石西峰の小さな窪地にテントを張った。そして近くに網を仕掛け、そこに男性たちが小便をしてその匂いでサンバーを引き寄せるのである。

サンバー追跡研究のマイルストーン

サンバーが現われた時に、どうやって網に追い込むか練習して夜を待った。テントから網の仕掛けまでは20メートルほどの距離である。夜になり気温が下がってくると、外から「麻酔を準備しろ!」という声が聞こえた。顔士清ともう一人の研究生が跳び出し、大声を上げながらライトをつけてサンバーを網の中へ追い込んだ。

網にかかったサンバーに獣医が麻酔を打ち、それが効いてきた頃、数名で飛び掛かって頭を押さえて足を縛り捕獲した。それからサンバーを吊るして体重や身長を計り、採血し、体表の寄生虫のサンプルも採り、無線発信機の首輪を取付けて放した。これは2009年の7月15日のことだ。こうして王穎と顔士清が率いるチームが首輪をつけることに初めて成功し、サンバーの追跡研究における重要なマイルストーンとなった。

困難続きの山中での研究

だが、順調なことばかりではなく、夜中に豪雨に見舞われることもある。山に挟まれた谷間にサンバーの罠を仕掛け、近くにテントを張ったところ、夜中にテントの下がぬかるんでいるのを感じて起きると、外の鍋やサンダルが水に浮いていた。そこで少し高い所へテントを移したが、そこも水に浸かってしまい、夜中に幾度も移動を繰り返した。

そこから月形池というところへ移動した後も強い風雨に見舞われてテントも設置できず、別の研究チームからテントを借りて6人で寝たところ、テントの下にまた水が溜まってきた。そこで同行していた先住民のベテラン猟師ダマ・リンガヴに尋ねると、彼は一つの物語を話してくれた。かつて集落の老人が話したことだが、何人かが猟に行き、悪天候に見舞われて水に浸かってしまった時、その場にとどまった人々は無事だったが、場所を移した人々は全員亡くなってしまったというのである。これを聞いた皆は顔を見合わせ、その場にとどまることにした。テントの中に水の通り道を掘り、6人でひとかたまりになって長い夜を過ごしたのだという。

もちろん楽しいこともある。サンバーは一頭一頭性格が異なるため、研究チームはそれぞれに名前を付けている。好奇心いっぱいの「好奇哥」は大きなオスで、まったく人見知りせず、テントの近くをうろうろする。捕らえて首輪をつけられた翌日もキャンプへ戻って来て研究者たちが何をしているのか観察しているのだという。すばしっこい「機霊哥」は、仕掛けた網の中に入ってエサだけ食べ、周囲に少しでも動きを感じると、素早く逃げていく。しばらくすると戻って来て再びエサだけ食べて逃げていくので、研究チームは疲れ果ててしまった。ある時は、角にひっかかった網を引きずりながら逃げていき、いくら探しても見つからなかったが、翌日また現われた。

環境への不安

近年、保護が功を奏してサンバーの数が少しずつ増えてきたが、サンバーには天敵がおらず、林業に影響が出始めた。特に標高の高い地域の針葉樹林で、ニイタカトドマツやタイワンツガなどが死んでしまい、中でも玉山国立公園で大きな被害が出ているのである。

屏東科技大学野生動物保育研究所の翁国精准教授の研究チームが玉山でサンプリングして調査したところ、サンバーの排泄物に見られる寄生虫の数が他の地域より高いことがわかった。樹皮とサンバーが各地で食べるヤダケに含まれる縮合型タンニンの量を調べたところ、樹皮によってタンニンの含有量は異なるが、ヤダケからはまったく検出されなかった。縮合型タンニンは消化器の寄生虫の駆除に役立つ。したがって、サンバーが寄生虫駆除のために樹皮をかじっている可能性もある。ただ、この仮説が成立するかどうかは、実験の完了を待たなければ分からない。

こうした悪影響の可能性だけでなく、良い研究成果も出ている。太魯閣国立公園管理処保育課の孫麗珠課長は、太魯閣国立公園内のサンバーの生態を研究してきた。4年余りにわたって、国立公園外の地域も含め、1000点以上のサンバーの排泄物のサンプルをとって遺伝子を調べたところ、台湾のサンバーは10万年前の高山氷河と雪による障壁に隔てられ「太魯閣雪覇」と「中央山脈」の二大グループに分けられると推論されるという。これは重大な新発見であり、サンバーに対する国民の理解を深めるものとなるだろう。

環境と経済と動物保全のバランス

台湾では「野生動物保育法」というように「保育」という言葉を使っているが、このことについて王؟oは次のように説明する。「30年余り前、私はconservationを『保護』ではなく『保育』と訳しました。当初、アメリカでは多くの動物が絶滅の危機に瀕しているというので保護を開始し、それをpreserveと言いましたが、それらの動物の数が増えてからはconserve(日本では保全と訳される)という表現を使うようになったのです」conservationというのは、保護によって数が増えた後、人間が利用するという概念だと説明する。顔士清は日本のニホンジカを例に挙げる。百年余り前、ニホンジカは絶滅の危機に瀕していた。そこで鹿猟を禁止すると、間もなくシカの天敵であるニホンオオカミが狩猟によって絶滅してしまった。その後、ニホンジカの数は増え続けたため、狩猟が解禁されたのである。現在、北海道では年に8万頭のニホンジカが狩猟の対象となっているが、それでもまだ多すぎ、農業や森林に大きな損失をもたらしているのである。

現在の台湾のサンバーの状況は50年前の日本のそれとよく似ている。王穎によると、保護対象の生物種の数が増えれば、一般の人々のエコツーリズムの目的として開放できる。エコツーリズムを通して人々が間近で観察することで、サンバーの棲息環境を守ろうという機運が高まり、環境保全の意識も高まる。また一方では特定の区域で先住民による狩猟に開放することで、その数を適正に維持することも可能だ。それにより、サンバーの数が増えすぎることによる環境へのダメージを抑えられ、また先住民族伝統の狩猟の祭儀やそれによる尊厳も守ることができ、狩猟の技術も受け継がれていく。こうすることで、サンバーは環境と経済と動物保全の架け橋となるのである。

 。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!