Taoyuan’s Daxi District

Where Tradition Is Up to Date
:::

2020 / November

Lynn Su /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Phil Newell


When people talk of Daxi, the first things that come to mind are dried tofu, marin­ated until it is dark and glossy, and beautiful, heavy rosewood furni­ture. However, these past few years the little town has been redefining itself with “Daxi studies,” exuding a new vitality and charm that are attracting travelers from all over.


If you’ve read the comic The Summer Temple Fair, drawn by Daxi native Zuo Hsuan, then you are probably somewhat familiar with the birthday of the Holy Emperor Lord Guan (Guan Yu), an event which is known as a “second new year” for the people of Daxi. But when you attend in person, the experience still blows you away.

The long parade is composed of over 30 groups from shetou—local trade and community-based associations that organize temple procession troupes for Guan Yu’s birthday. Strident beiguan music is played on traditional Chinese instruments and the sound of firecrackers resounds to the skies. There are bright, gorgeous banners, and performers wear colorful clothing and makeup. Over 100 performers dressed up as enormous immortals slowly stroll through the venerable old quarter of Daxi. It’s hard to imagine that this is a normal working day! The streets are packed with people, including local residents, and even many Daxi natives who live elsewhere have taken time out to return home and celebrate together for two days and nights.

Walking with the gods

The birthday celebration and procession for Guan Yu at Puji Temple make up the most famous event in Daxi, and can be traced back more than a century to 1917, in the era of Japanese rule. It is said that believers organized them to thank Guan Yu for his protection. Because of the deity’s great prestige and reputation, the celebrations steadily became more organized, and believers formed shetou based on their professions or communities. Early on there were only a few major shetou, but the number has grown to about 31 today and is still expanding.

Thinking back to the plot of The Summer Temple Fair, the people of Daxi start preparing for the brief two days of activities months in advance. First, the head of each shetou sends out letters to members in early June. Not only do the members each have to know their jobs (playing beiguan, dancing with drums, or dressing up as household generals or princelings) and repeatedly rehearse after work, they also have to clean up and put in order the giant immortals costumes that have been gathering dust for a year.

The evening before Guan Yu’s birthday, the icons of the deities venerated by each shetou are carried out on palan­quins for “nighttime visits,” and finally converge on Puji Temple for the formal commencement of the birthday celebrations. The following day they will form a procession that tours the entire area, with a column of performance troupes and believers stretching out for ­several ­kilometers. The activity lasts all through the night, and for these two days the town doesn’t sleep.

At this time, looking out from the covered sidewalk, the street looks like a moving painter’s canvas. Each shetou comes up with creative ideas for the procession based on their history. The Xieyi group, which was mainly formed by wood products businesses, carries a large carpenter’s ink marker, while the Xing’an group, composed mainly of traders, hoists a large abacus on their shoulders. Because the deity worshipped by each shetou is different, the giant immortals that accompany them are also different. Various figures, from Zhou Cang, Guan Ping (Guan Yu’s eldest son), and Guan Feng (Guan Yu’s daughter), to the all-seeing Qianliyan and all-hearing Shunfeng’er, the Third Prince, and the Lord of the Moon appear in turns. Set off against the background of the vintage streets, they create a bustling and dreamlike scene.

Living in a historic town

There are old streets in many localities in Taiwan, with no shortage of baroque-inspired architecture and plenty of restaurants with authentic local foods and shops selling gifts and souvenir items. But Daxi’s old quarter, which got the town named as one of Taiwan’s “Top Ten Small Towns for Tourism” in 2012, definitely has its extraordinary aspects.

Let’s start the story from the beginning. Daxi developed relatively early on, and an old flagstone trail running from the banks of the Dahan River to the top of the cliff that marks the edge of the plateau on which the town is built bears witness to its prosperous past. At that time, before the construction of the Taoyuan irrigation canal further upstream, the river flowed with great power. The trail, built with stones from the river bed, was the main artery for transporting goods. Tea and camphor from Mt. Jiaoban were carried down to the dock and shipped downriver to Da­dao­cheng and Huwei (today’s Tamsui).

The place’s unique advantages attracted the Lin Benyuan family (then one of Taiwan’s five leading clans and today better known as the Banqiao Lins) to set up an enterprise in Daxi. The Lins hired a number of craftsmen from the Chinese mainland to relocate to Daxi, which, along with the convenience of river transportation, was the origin of the woodworking tradition in the town.

Times have changed, and Daxi’s woodworking industry has declined. But it’s worth noting that thanks to the town’s convenient location, its good local services, and the leisurely pace of life, there has not been large-scale popu­lation outflow from Daxi.

All of Daxi is a museum

The foundation of the Daxi Wood Art Ecomuseum in 2015 marked a new milestone in the town’s development. The museum is housed in a group of renovated former Japanese police dormitory buildings along the clifftop overlooking the river.

The concept of the “ecomuseum” or “environmental museum” originated in Europe. Stepping inside the Wood Art Eco­museum you discover that unlike a typical museum, it does not have a huge, eye-catching exhibition space and clearly defined grounds; its buildings are low and scattered, and are not enclosed within a perimeter wall. Correspond­ingly, it aims to operate in a way that blends in with the local surround­ings, and invites community residents to get involved.

The museum’s role is no longer that of an authoritative institution looking down from an ivory tower, but rather a companion that assists in the process of cultural and historical reconstruction and in developing a sense of identity focused on local life and collective memories. “The key to environmental and cultural change should be people, so the work we focus on is all related to people, whether this be empowerment, exchanges, or paving the way for all kinds of possibilities,” says museum secretary Chen Pei-hsin. After several years of effort, local people can feel that little by little, Daxi is changing.

In its core missions of research and exhibitions, the museum has a strong focus on local culture. Through its outreach activities it has also attracted the participation of large numbers of Daxi residents who aspire to change their community. Some have begun to transform privately owned commercial or residential spaces into “street-­corner galleries,” or have independently organ­ized study partner­ships to interact with and learn from each other.

In the whole of Daxi District there are nearly 30 street-­corner galleries, such as the Sinnan 12 arts and crafts store, which is a renovated traditional residence. If visit­ors are ready to slow down a little and chat with the locals, they can hear some unique small-town stories.

From rosewood altars to designer furniture

Woodworking, Daxi’s most famous industry, can be traced back well over a century to the Qing Dynasty. In its heyday in the 1970s and 80s, there were two to three hundred businesses selling wood products in the town. But later, like many traditional craft industries, it could not compete with low-cost producers in mainland China and Southeast Asia. The increasingly widespread use of steel and plastic, and the advent of major furniture brands like Ikea, only hastened its decline. Today there are only a third as many wood products outlets in Daxi as when the industry was at its peak.

These are mainly small and medium-sized family enter­prises that have passed down through the genera­tions. Daxi has not given rise to any famous furniture brand names to rival those in the US, Europe, and Japan, yet its highly skilled craftspeople are still a precious asset of which local people are proud. Li Wangyu, founder of the Zhouyu Woodworking Company, asserts: “In terms of skills, we can compete with anyone in the world.”

Accordingly, woodworking businesses still in opera­tion in Daxi, especially those run by second- or third-­generation owners, are extremely active in trying to transform their industry. They want to carry forward the consummate skills inherited from the previous generations of craftsmen while at the same time making designer furniture to meet the needs of contemporary Taiwanese.

Li Wangyu, with a firm grasp of the skills and knowledge accumulated since his grandfather’s generation, decided six years ago to set up his own brand and founded Zhouyu Woodworking Company, with a focus on modern furniture. He has abandoned the heavy form and structure of traditional furniture, yet is doing his utmost to retain the traditions of Daxi’s solid-wood furniture and top-notch bespoke craftsmanship.

Whenever he receives an order for a custom-made piece, Li will discuss with the client in detail how they intend to use the furniture, and make adjustments accord­ingly. The items that his company produces are not varnished or painted; instead he uses a food-grade protect­ive oil, to enable customers to enjoy the experience of directly touching solid wood. He also shares with us various aspects of the meticulous production process, such as how the precision of a joint’s construction can deter­mine the durability of a piece of furniture. Another example is sliding doors, which must be made suitable for Taiwan’s hot, humid climate by leaving a gap between the frame and the door panels, so that the two-­layered panels can expand and contract without warping.

Thanks to the platform provided by the Wood Art Ecomuseum, second-generation woodworkers with similar thinking are able to support each other. Young craftsmen (including Li Wangyu) representing five different brands have organ­ized a study group that they call the Wood Creativity Nest. They not only share informa­tion but also boldly engage in exchanges with the outside world, in order to stimulate their creativity and seek vitality within tradition.

Carrying the burden of the glory days of the past, each step they take on the path of innovation and transformation is difficult. But for Daxi woodworking, whose fortunes have always been closely bound up with the lives of ordinary people, as long as those involved are willing to apply themselves steadfastly and gradually accumu­late experience, they will stand the test of time. Then they will surely reap the fruits of their labors, and live up to the famous name of Daxi.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

大溪學

在傳統中演繹新日常

文‧蘇俐穎 圖‧林旻萱

說起大溪,首先想起的不外乎滷得黝黑發亮的豆干,或者厚重華麗的紅木家具。不過這幾年,小鎮重新以「大溪學」之名出發,散發出有別以往的活力與魅力。穿越數十甚至上百年的民俗技藝、建築聚落,被留存與發揚;沉澱多時的人文故事,被挖掘、記錄,吸引著各地的遊客前往。


走訪大溪以前,已先看過了由大溪子弟左萱所畫的漫畫《神之鄉》,對傳說中「大溪人的第二個過年」的關聖帝君聖誕慶典,有了梗概認識,但親臨現場,仍難掩震撼。

由30幾個「社頭」所組成的行伍魚貫綿長,高亢的北管與激昂的鞭炮聲響徹雲霄,鮮豔華麗的旗幟、衣著繽紛妝點,古典的老街中上百尊尪仔、仙仔漫步優遊……難以想像,這可是平常的工作日!路上人潮如織,本地人也好,就連外出打拚的鄉親也告假回鄉,一同狂歡個兩日兩夜。

關帝聖誕,與神同遊

大溪聞名於世的普濟堂關聖帝君祝壽及遶境活動,最早紀錄可溯至日治時代大正三年(1917年),至今已逾百年。傳聞信眾為了感念關聖帝君的庇佑而舉辦,因著神靈威名遠揚,慶典漸有組織,信眾依職業、聚落組成不同的「社頭」,最早有「同人」、「樂安」、「協義」、「興安」、「大有」、「新勝」、「慶義」等社頭團體,到今日發展成約31個,且數目仍持續增長。

確實如《神之鄉》裡頭所描繪的劇情,短短兩日的活動,大溪人就像在籌辦什麼盛會,早在數個月前就已全城動員。首先,各社的值年爐主在六月初就發函給社員,社員就北管、花鼓、將軍、童仔、龍陣、舞獅等任務,各司其職,下班後反覆團練操演,還得為塵封一年的神仙尪仔重新整裝。

直到關聖帝君聖誕的前一日,各社供奉的神尊就會起駕暗訪,最後再齊聚於普濟堂,祝壽大典正式展開,翌日再遶行全境,陣頭、信眾尾隨綿延數公里長,活動通宵達旦,這兩日的小鎮猶若不夜城。

「以前到了這一天,大溪家家戶戶都會請客。」鑼鼓喧天,煙硝夾雜著震耳的鞭炮聲,騎樓下摩肩擦踵,在好奇張望的同時,大溪居民邱瓊淑熱情地與我們分享著。

在交通不發達的昔日,大溪人往往藉這闔家團圓的大好日子,宴請親朋好友,甚至邀請外地客下榻一宿,隨著時代不同,這樣的光景雖然不再,但近年關聖帝君聖誕的信仰內涵重新以「大溪大禧」的品牌包裝,廣為行銷,倒是吸引了不少愛看熱鬧的觀光客特別前往。

此時此刻,從騎樓看出去的街道就有如移動的畫布,各社頭的行伍依著組成背景援引創意,主要由木器行組成的「協義社」,扛著巨大墨斗;以生意人為主的「興安社」,則抬著大算盤。也因各社供奉的神明不同,隨行的仙尪神將也有別,周倉、關平、關鳳、王甫、廖化、千里眼、順風耳、三太子、太陰星君輪番出場,在古典的市街背景烘托之下,顯得熱鬧又夢幻,也再次證實了「神將窟」美名之不虛。

生活在歷史城鎮中

台灣各地都有老街存在,巴洛克風格的建築、道地的小吃伴手禮,也不罕見,但2012年獲選為「十大觀光小城」的大溪老街,確實有不凡之處。

故事得從頭說起。大溪發展得早,一條由大漢溪河岸通往崖邊高地的石板古道,就道盡了過往的光榮。彼時,大漢溪水勢澎湃,據聞由溪底石頭取材所建成的石板古道, 擔當著物資運載的重責。人們藉由古道,前往角板山等地區,山上所產的茶葉與樟腦也能運送下山,就近到碼頭裝載上船,再從大漢溪送往下游的大稻埕、滬尾等地。

環境上的得天獨厚,吸引昔日台灣五大家族之一的林本源家族(即一般人所熟知的板橋林家)在大溪建立家業,林家禮聘許多唐山匠師到此定居,再加上河運的便利性,開啟了大溪木藝的濫觴。

雖然時空遞變,大溪木藝沒落,但值得慶幸的是,由於地理南來北往的便利性,以及完備的生活機能與閑適的生活步調,大溪人口並未流失太多。

甚至許多在近年來到大溪的新移民都說:「大溪的土地會黏人。」老街並非徒留形式的空殼,行走在街上,依舊可看到里仁為美的風景,也因為生活在底蘊豐富的地方,與居民私下閒談,往往可以聽聞到許多引人入勝的精采故事,也能由衷感受到他們對故鄉的喜愛與自豪之情。

整個大溪,都是博物館

2015年,「大溪木藝生態博物館」(簡稱「木博館」)設立,迎來了小鎮發展的新里程。原先依照崖線建立的日式警察宿舍群,經登錄為文化資產,在修繕後轉型成博物館的形式經營。

所謂的「生態博物館」,亦即「環境博物館」,概念源於歐洲,踏入其中即能發覺,除了不像一般博物館擁有一棟顯眼的巨型館舍建築,以及明顯的園區界線,木博館的建物群相當低矮、分散,更以無圍牆作為一大特點;而與之呼應,在經營方針上,更以融入在地環境,邀集社區居民共同參與,作為重要經營的原則。

當博物館的角色不再是高高在上的權威機構,而以陪伴之姿,協助當地的文史重建與建立在地人的認同意識,「環境與文化改變的關鍵應該是人,所以我們針對的,都是人的工作,不論是培力、交流,或者開拓各種可能性。」木博館秘書陳佩歆這樣說。經過幾年耕耘,當地人也能感受到,大溪一點一滴地不一樣了。

除了作為博物館本業的研究內容、策展方向,緊緊扣合在地文化,經過館方的媒合與串聯,有志改變社區的小鎮居民也紛紛投入參與,有的業者開始將個人的商業空間或生活場域轉化為「街角館」,也有居民自主組成共學夥伴,相互學習、交流。

舉例來說,原本承接下老屋修復案,才來到大溪的林澤昇、鍾佩林夫妻檔,也因此落地生根。他們買下三進三落的老宅,從原本的殘垣敗瓦中打造出夢想的家,甚至把空間闢為「新南12文創實驗商行」,除了提供餐飲、住宿的服務,也與社區媽媽合作,販售手工作品,遊客也可以藉由牆上的插畫、照片了解老屋的前世今生,「這棟房子長在大溪,講的故事、賣的商品,都是為了大溪。我跟先生努力把房子修好,就是要講在地人的故事。」鍾佩林浪漫地說。

整個大溪區上,共有近30個像新南12的街角館存在,只要遊客願意緩下腳步,與當地人聊一聊,都能聽到截然不同的小鎮故事。

從紅木神桌到現代精品家具

大溪最著名的木藝,最早可溯源到清代,發展超過百年的產業,在1970~80年代達到鼎盛,最高曾有兩、三百家木器行同時存在,直到後來和許多傳統產業一樣,不敵中國、東南亞的低價成本傾軋,優勢不再,加上塑膠、鋼材的普及,以及大型家具品牌如IKEA的進入,趨於沒落,如今的店家僅存三分之一。

雖然大溪以代代相傳的中小型木器行為主,並沒有成為足以媲美歐美日,名號響亮的家具品牌,但身懷絕技的藝師依舊是大溪人引以為豪的珍貴資產,「論技術,我們不會輸給國外。」洲宇木業創辦人李汪宇這樣認為。

尤其,比之過往,人們視家具為傳家之物,不論是為出嫁的女兒訂製嫁妝,或者供奉祖先、神明用的神桌,都以耐用與精良的工藝為選擇標準。當時代改變,工廠量產的廉價家具開始廣為大眾接受,雖然形體上轉為簡潔、輕盈,符合現代人的生活習慣與審美要求,但是品質卻大幅下降,甚至對於材料、工藝等相關知識也一併流失,故許多人會說,平價通路買到的家具雖然好看,但不耐用。

面對大時代改變,大溪至今仍在運營的木器行,只要是第二、三代接手的,都積極力圖轉型,他們想傳承從上一代老匠師所承襲下來的精湛技藝,同時又做出符合台灣人需求的精品家具。

如同從小就在家裡工廠幫忙的李汪宇,他的爺爺李順益是「建漢實業」的創辦人,已是耄耋之年的李順益,曾赴日留學,後來開設了木材處理廠,因為木材知識豐富,被當地人尊稱為「木頭博士」。

李汪宇把握了從父執輩開始累積的技術與知識,六年前自立門戶創辦洲宇木業,並且將品牌定調在現代家具,有了前人的累積,加上身在木匠之家,豐富的實作經驗,他一改傳統家具的厚重形體,卻竭力留下大溪實木家具的傳統與訂製精品的規格。

在每一次的訂製接案,李汪宇都會細細與客人討論使用的需求,再依其微調細節。而自家出品的產品,也不上漆,而改用食用等級的護木油,為的就是讓客人可以直接體驗實木家具的觸感。他也跟我們分享家具製作上的各種講究,好比榫卯的精密度,將決定了家具耐用與否;或者像拉門,為了符合台灣炎熱潮濕的氣候,門框與門板之間留下縫隙,讓雙層的門板能有熱脹冷縮的餘裕,以免變形。

也幸有木博館作為平台,同樣思維的二代能夠彼此應援,包括李汪宇在內,有五家不同品牌的年輕藝師以「木創巢」之名組成共學團體,他們除了互通聲氣,更勇於向外交流,為的就是刺激創意,從傳統中尋找生機。

木博館也推出自有品牌「木沐MUKKI」,與大溪木藝師攜手學習開發產品、量產的過程,豆干造型的印章,或者從陀螺取經的線香盤,是大溪人集體記憶的轉化,「我們希望讓參與的藝師了解,進入一般通路的定價與生產策略的不同。所以,這不只是商品開發的案子,更像是一個培力計畫。」木博館秘書陳佩歆說。

雖然背負往日榮光,創新轉型之路每一步都走得不容易,但一直與常民生活休戚與共的大溪木藝,只要長期累積,禁得起時光淬鍊,必能有所收穫,不負百年溪城之名。                                                

「大渓学」

——伝統を新たな日常へ

文・蘇俐穎 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・松本 幸子

桃園市の大渓と言えばまず思い浮かべるのは、真っ黒い豆干(干し豆腐)やローズウッドの高級家具だろう。だが、ここ数年この町は「大渓学」と銘打って、新たな魅力を発信している。工芸や建築物を保存・継承し、眠っていた物語を発掘・記録することで、新たな観光スポットとして注目を浴びているのだ。


桃園市の大渓を訪れる前に、同地出身の漫画家、左萱が関帝生誕の祭りを描いた『神之郷』を読んで予習しておいた。だが、「大渓の人にとっては第二の正月」と呼ばれるこの祭りを実際に見ると、それはかなりの衝撃だった。

30以上の団体からなる祭りの行列が延々と続き、にぎやかな音楽とけたたましい爆竹の中、色とりどりの衣装や旗を翻らせ、さまざまな神様の人形が古いバロック建築の連なる商店街を練り歩く。今日は平日だというのに、想像を超える人出だ。地元の人も、或いは仕事を休んで帰省した人も、ともに丸2日間この祭りに酔いしれる。

関帝生誕を神々とともに

大渓の普済堂の関聖帝君生誕祝いの祭りは、最も古い記録で大正3年(1917年)に遡るからすでに100年を超える。伝わるところでは、この祭りは関聖帝君の加護に感謝するために始められ、やがて霊験あらたかだと名が広まるにつれて組織化され、職業や集落別に「社頭」という祭りの参加団体が作られていった。最も古くからあるのは「同人」「楽安」「協義」「興安」「大有」「新勝」「慶義」といった団体で、現在は31団体と増え続けている。

漫画『神之郷』に描かれていたように、たった2日のイベントのために、大渓の人々は数ヵ月前から総動員で準備を始める。まず、各社頭のその年の炉主(責任者)が6月初旬に社頭メンバーに通知を出し、メンバーは各種舞踊や武芸、音楽などのチームに分かれ、毎日仕事が終わった後にチームで練習したり、1年間眠っていた神の姿の被り物の衣装などを整えたりする。

そして関帝生誕日前夜になると、各社頭の祀る神が町を練り歩いた後、普済堂に集合し、生誕祭の正式な始まりとなる。翌日には、各社頭や信徒が延々と数キロも連なって町全体を練り歩く。祭りは夜を徹して翌日まで行われ、2日間、大渓は不夜城と化す。

「昔は大渓の祭りの日には、どの家も客を食事に招いたものです」銅鑼やチャルメラがけたたましく鳴り、爆竹の煙が舞う人ごみの中を、物珍しそうに歩いていると、大渓在住の邱瓊淑さんがこう説明してくれた。

交通の発達していなかった昔は、この日のために家族が故郷に戻って来て、親族縁者も招いて食卓を囲んだ。遠方から来る客には泊まってもらった。時代とともにそういう光景はなくなったものの、現在は観光路線を打ち出したのが成功し、多くの人が訪れるようになった。

商店の軒先から眺める通りは、まるで動く絵画のようだ。それぞれ創意を凝らした社頭の隊列が続く。家具業者からなる「協義社」は巨大な墨壺を、商売人で組織する「興安社」は大きな算盤を担いでいる。社頭によって祀る神が違うので、脇に控える神々も顔ぶれが異なる。周倉、関平、関鳳、王甫、廖化、千里眼、順風耳、三太子、太陰星君などの神の被り物が代わる代わる登場し、バロック建築を背景にしたその喧噪は幻想的とも言え、この地が「神将窟(神々でにぎわう場所)」と呼ばれるのもうなずける。

歴史の町に暮らす

古い町並みは台湾各地に残るし、バロック建築や手土産となる名産のある町も珍しくはない。だが2012年「十大観光タウン」に選ばれた大渓の商店街には確かに他にはない魅力がある。

最も古い話から始めよう。大渓の発展はかなり早かった。大漢渓の川岸から山間地へと続く石畳の古道が往年の繁栄を物語る。当時、豊かに水をたたえていた大漢渓の河原の石を、物資運搬に耐え得るよう古道の石畳に用いたという。人々は古道を上って角板山などへ行き、山地の茶葉や樟脳を背負って下山、近くの埠頭から船に積んで大漢渓を下り、大稲埕(現在の迪化街辺り)や滬尾(現在の淡水)などに運んだ。

そうした好条件に注目したのが当時の台湾の5大豪族の一つ、林本源家族(板橋林家)で、大渓で事業を始めた。中国大陸から多くの職人を招いて住まわせ、河川輸送の利便性を生かし、この地で木工芸を発展させたのだ。

時代とともに木工業は衰退したが、幸運なことに大渓は、南北の地に通じた利便性と、町としての機能が整っていたこと、そしてゆったりと快適な暮らしがあったことなどから、人口の流失はさほど進まなかった。

それどころか、近年海外から移り住んだ人々も「大渓の土地には離れがたい魅力がある」と言う。保存された町並みも単なる抜け殻ではなく、変わらぬ人々の暮らしがそこにある。また住民の話からも、故郷への愛や誇りが感じられる。

2015年、町発展の記念的事業として「大渓木芸生態博物館(以下「木博館」)」が設立された。川岸に並んでいた警察宿舎(もとは日本統治時代の建物)が文化財として登録されたのを機に、修築して博物館にしたのである。

大渓全体が博物館

生態博物館、或いは環境博物館という概念はヨーロッパに始まったものだ。一般の博物館とは異なり、大きな建物を持たず、敷地も明確な境界線のないことが多い。この木博館も低い建物が分散し、周囲に塀を持たないのが特徴だ。それに呼応するように経営方針は、地元に溶け込み、地域住民とともに運営することが大原則だ。

博物館は、高みから啓蒙しようという権威的な機構ではもはやなく、人々に寄り添い、地域文化や郷土愛の構築を支援する。「環境や文化を変えるのに大切なのは人です。だから我々は人を対象に、人材育成や交流、さまざまな可能性を探ります」と、木博館の陳佩歆秘書は言う。数年間の運営で、地域住民も大渓のさまざまな魅力を感じるようになった。博物館の本業である展示や研究のほかに、地域文化とリンクさせた取組みで、新たな町づくりに加わる住民も増えてきた。例えば、店や生活空間を「街角館」にして文化を紹介したり、住民同士で学習や交流のための「共学」グループを作ったりしている。

林沢昇さんと鍾佩林さん夫婦は、古い家屋の修築で大渓に来たのが、そのまま暮らすようになった。崩れかけていた伝統家屋を自分の理想の家に改築しただけでなく、そこで「新南12文創実験商行(文化クリエイティブ実験商店)」を開いて食事や宿泊サービスを提供し、地域のお母さんたちと作った手工芸品も販売する。訪れた人は壁に貼られたイラストや写真から、この古い家屋の物語を知ることになる。「この家は大渓で生まれ育ったのですから、話す物語も売る商品もすべて大渓のためにあるべきで、私と夫が一生懸命にこの家を修築したのも、この地域の物語を伝えるためです」と鍾佩林さんは語る。

大渓全体で「新南12」のような街角館が30近くある。時間をかけてそれらを回り、地元の人とふれ合えば、全く異なる物語が聞けるだろう。

伝統神具からモダン家具へ

大渓を代表する木工芸は、清の時代から100年余り続く伝統産業で、1970~80年代の最盛期には200~300軒の木製家具店が存在した。だが、やがてほかの伝統産業と同じく、中国や東南アジアの安い労働力に勝てず、プラスチックやスチール製品の普及、やがてはIKEAなど大型家具ブランドの進出もあり、大渓の家具店は3分の1に減ってしまった。

代々経営されてきたのは主に小中の家具店で、欧米や日本の大型家具ブランドとは比較にならない。だが職人の優れた技は昔も今も大渓が誇る貴重な財産で「技術なら我々は外国に負けません」と「洲宇木業」創設者、李汪宇さんは言う。

昔の人は家具を代々使っていく物と考えていた。嫁入り道具や、祖先や神を祀る台など、いつまでも使える精巧な工芸が選ばれたのである。しかし今は、工場で大量生産された廉価な家具が広く受け入れられ、シンプルなデザインも現代人の感覚にマッチする。一方、品質は大きく劣化したうえ、材料や工芸についての人々の知識も失われてしまった。低価格で出回る家具は見た目は良くても壊れやすいと、こぼす人は多い。

大きな時代の変化に直面し、大渓の家具店では2代目3代目が跡を継いだ場合、積極的に変革を試みている。上の世代の高い技術を受け継ぐだけでなく、台湾人のニーズに合った高級家具を作ることを目指す。

例えば、李汪宇さんは幼い頃から家の工場を手伝っていた。彼の祖父の李順益さんは若い頃に日本留学の経験があり、後に木材を扱う「建漢実業」を設立した。木材の知識が豊富で、地元では「木材博士」と呼ばれている。

そうした上の世代の技術や知識を受け継ぎ、李汪宇さんは6年前に独立して「洲宇木業」を設立した。重厚な伝統家具は扱わず、現代的な家具に狙いを定めながらも、大渓の無垢材家具やオーダーメイドの伝統を大切にする。

注文が入ると李さんは必ず客と細部にわたって話し合い、ニーズに合わせて調整する。また無垢材の触感を肌で感じてもらおうと、自社製品には一般のワニスを塗らず、食用できるようなオイルで仕上げる。李さんはいかに細部に注意を払って家具を作るか説明してくれた。例えば、ほぞ継の正確さが家具の寿命を決めること、或いは、気温も湿度も高い台湾では、引き戸にも温度差を考慮したゆとりが必要なことなどだ。

幸い、木博館をプラットフォームとし、考えを同じくする若い2代目たちが集まって、五つのブランドからなる「木創巣」という学習グループを立ち上げた。互いに情報交換し、外部との交流も行なう。創意を刺激し合って、伝統を新たなビジネスにつなげるためだ。

木博館でも「木沐MUKKI」というオリジナルブランドを立ち上げ、大渓の職人とともに製品開発や量産などを学ぶ。豆干の形をした印鑑や、コマからヒントを得た線香皿などの製品は、大渓の人々の記憶を作品化したものだ。「参加する職人さんには、一般的な販売ルートの価格設定と生産戦略を知ってもらいたいのです。つまり、これは商品開発というだけでなく、人材育成の場でもあるのです」と木博館の陳佩歆秘書は言う。

かつての栄光を背負いながら変革の道を歩むのは容易ではない。だが人々の暮らしとともに歩んできた大渓の木工は、100年の町の名に恥じることなく、やがて大きな実りを生むことだろう。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!