Balancing Production and the Environment

The Underforest Economy Takes Off
:::

2020 / May

Esther Tseng /photos courtesy of Jimmy Lin /tr. by Phil Newell


The plant life of forests is rich and varied. Raising bees on the forest floor can provide an abundant supply of honey, while the bees can also increase the rate at which trees set seed. Raising chickens and growing mushrooms on logs can bring in additional income that helps foresters plant more trees. And when farmers don’t interfere with the forest, and uphold the practice of applying neither pesticides nor chemical fertilizers, they can develop ecotourism in the beautiful, fecund woodlands.

This month we visit the communities of Penglai in Miaoli and Sakur in ­Hualien, to meet people who are making efforts to develop the “underforest economy.” They are sketching the contours of the kind of economy envisioned in the Satoyama Initi­ative, where daily life and economic activity coexist in harmony with the environment.


Driving along the winding mountain road, we arrive at Penglai Village in Miaoli County’s Nanzhuang Township, surrounded by the Jiali Mountain Range and Mt. Luchang. The air is damp and the landscape is wreathed in fog, with a temperature several degrees cooler than in the lowlands. We feel as if we are deep in the mountains, even though this place is only 500 meters above sea level.

For the past two years Ken Chih-you, a Saisiyat elder from Penglai, has been guiding fellow Saisiyat in develop­ing the underforest economy. After starting out with just nine beehives, their operation has grown to 350 hives in 12 apiaries, from which they have thus far collected and sold some 780 kilograms of honey. They also raise chickens and grow mushrooms on wooden logs, and they are sharing their experience with indigenous com­mun­ities around Taiwan.

Protecting the forests

Ken, who is director of the Alliance of Indigen­ous Peoples, once made a TV travel series focusing on indigen­ous communities for the Eastern Broadcasting Company, for which he visited Aboriginal villages throughout Taiwan. He discovered that his own home village was extremely short of resources and very poor. Nonetheless, he says proudly, “We haven’t sold a single plot of land to Han Chinese, and we have preserved the mountain forest intact.”

“However, in the past the policy of the Forestry Bur­eau was that we couldn’t touch a single tree or blade of grass in forest areas.” Ken cannot help but raise his voice as he says; “When I was small, the people of my com­munity all called the Forestry Bureau ‘the Demon.’ This was because the Aboriginal reserve land of our village was right next to an area of forest land, but it was against the law for anyone to cut any wood, so we had a lot of conflicts with the Forestry Bureau.”

But in 2018, the Forestry Bureau and the Saisiyat reconciled their differences and signed a partnership agreement. In 2019, based on the concept of joint management of mountain forests, the bureau commissioned the Saisiyat people to organize forest ranger patrols, which operate around the Danan Forest Road, the Penglai Forest Road, and Mt. Jiali.

When Forestry Bureau director-general Lin Hwa-ching proposed an underforest economy program, people quickly remembered that beekeeping used to be a part of Saisiyat life. Ken Chih-you says: “The most attractive thing to me about develop­ing underforest activities is that they don’t damage the environment. The second thing is that we can use ecological resources to increase indigenous communities’ incomes.”

In 2018 Ken recruited nine fellow villagers, who first went for classes at the Mingde Apiary, after which the Forestry Bureau’s Hsinchu Forest District Office made available an area of thinned forest where they could place beehives. Each person started with one hive, but by now they have expanded to 12 apiaries located in areas where there are Saisiyat communities, including Hsinchu County’s Wufeng Township and Miaoli’s Shitan Township. In 2019, these beekeeping activities brought in income of NT$1 million.

Located in remote mountain areas, indigenous communities lack job opportunities. The underforest economy offers opportunities to revitalize mountain villages. Away Dayen Sawan, head of Penglai Village, declares, “The under­forest economy production and marketing cooperative that we set up now has more than 50 members. New people are joining every month, and we have even been able to attract young people back to the community to help out.”

A way forward for reforestation

In fact, the Forestry Bureau set up an underforest economy promotion team as early as 2016. Developing the under­forest economy is not only in step with the inter­national trends of coexistence with forest ecologies and raising the value of forest-based economic activities, it also offers a way forward for the National Reforest­ation Program, launched 20 years ago.

In 1996, Typhoon Herb swept through Taiwan, causing enormous damage. Landslides and debris flows ravaged large areas of forest. In hopes of restoring the land, the Forestry Bureau launched a raft of incentives and sub­sidies for tree planting under the National Reforest­ation Program. Twenty years on, small seedlings have grown into large trees, but the decline of the timber industry and low incomes for foresters have affected the care and manage­ment of planted forest.

Within the Hualien Forest District, some 2000 hectares have been planted with trees such as Formosan sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana) that nowadays have a low value as timber. In April of 2017 the Forestry Bureau’s Hualien Forest District Office (HFDO) began to use Nanhua Forest Park in Hualien’s Ji’an Township as an education center to promote the underforest economy. They studied how to cultivate mushrooms on logs cut from trees with high carbohydrate content and high lignin—such as Formosan sweetgum, ring-cupped oak (Quercus glauca), and Formosan acacia (Acacia confusa)—as well as underforest beekeeping.

Bees: An environmental touchstone

Section chief Chiu Huang-sheng and specialist Lü Kunwang of the HFDO both sought out teachers to educate themselves about mushroom growing and bee­keeping, learning by doing before going on to guide foresters. However, the process was not all plain sailing. When inoculating logs with mushroom spawn, initially they faced the problem that the inoculation failed and penicillium mold grew on the logs rather than mushrooms. But in the second year their success rate reached 100%. They also encountered problems with beekeeping. One day they found the ground around the hives littered with dead honeybees after the bees were attacked by Asian giant hornets.

To prevent the incursions of these “terror­ists,” at first they put up protective netting around their beehives. But the hornets would just climb all over the netting and stare in ferociously at the little honeybees, so that the bees didn’t dare venture out to collect nectar. They were unable to find effective solutions either on the Internet or in books, and when they asked professional bee­keepers, they learned that the bee­keepers all used pesti­cides to eradicate the hornets.

However, a core value of the underforest economy is to be environmentally friendly, so they rejected the use of pesticides. In the end, they hit upon a ­solution by chance. After some beehives were moved into a shed with several windows, Lü Kunwang noticed that the bees could choose any window to fly out to collect nectar, while the hornets grew tired of circling around and just left. Inspired by this observation, Lü had workers surround the apiary with protective netting with a mesh size of eight millimeters, large enough for the bees to go out but too small for the hornets to get in. This inven­tion dispelled the threat posed by the hornets.

Nevertheless, however vicious a killer the Asian giant hornet may be, it is not nearly as serious a threat to honeybees as are pesticides. Lü notes that when the bees are in flight on their way to collect nectar, if they encounter pesti­cide spraying at betel nut plantations or vegetable farms, they might be able to just make it back to their hives, but there will be piles of corpses inside and outside the hive. This is why people say that beekeeping is the best indicator for measuring the health of the forest ecology.

Restoring community vitality

A common problem for economic development in remote mountain forests is that the labor force in mountain villages is limited in size and is aging. For example, to develop the underforest economy the Forestry Bureau encouraged foresters to take up mushroom farming. But to grow mushrooms on logs, typically about 150 logs totaling four metric tons are drilled and inoculated with mushroom spawn, after which they have to be piled up, turned over, stood upright, and knocked over, all on slopeland. Some elderly foresters had no interest in cultiv­at­ing mushrooms because they could no longer handle the physical labor required. However, in the process of learning how to grow mushrooms, Forestry Bureau staff were able to mediate the direct sale of logs to mushroom farmers in other areas through the Shui­lian Cooperative at a cost of NT$5500 per ton, including transportation (in the past the foresters sold the logs to middlemen at NT$900 per ton). In 2019 the co­opera­tive sold 62 tons of logs while avoiding exploita­tion by middle­men, thereby raising the incomes of foresters.

In March of 2019 the Nanhua Forest Park received a telephone call from Amis, Bunun, and Sakizaya members of the Alliance of Indigenous Peoples, who were calling at the suggestion of Ken Chih-you and Forestry Bureau director-general Lin Hwa-ching to ask if they could come and learn beekeeping.

Nu Watan u Kumuti, former chief of the indigenous community of Sakur (Chinese name Sagu’er) in Hualien City, provided land where the trainees could place their beehives and grow mushrooms. Group members took shifts together to take care of the bees, writing up records for their days on duty and sharing information on the bees’ condition via a Line messaging group. Over the past year they have gone from 15 hives to nearly 100, and have even attracted observers from communities in Hualien’s Wanrong and Haiduan townships.

Economic stimulus from ecotourism

Nu Watan u Kumuti, who teaches the Sakizaya language and is director of the Hualien County Indi­gen­ous Peoples Eco-Friendly Industry Promotion Association, says earnestly: “We started beekeeping in hopes of develop­ing an industry in indigenous communities, perhaps even with every household keeping a hive, so that young people from our communities can see that something is being done. This will bring their hearts and minds back home, so that they return to the mountain villages and we can hand the baton to them.”

One of the alliance members, Lin Jinfu, former dir­ector of the Economic Development Department at the Council of Indigenous Peoples, echoes Sakur community chief Xu Cong when he says: “Developing the under­forest economy is an eco-friendly policy. We can turn apiaries into classrooms where students from neighboring schools can come to learn about nature. In combination with the nearby Sakur Waterfall and Sakur Trail, and the wild vegetable market, they can also be part of the founda­tion for developing ecotourism.”

Ecotourism, which generates economic benefit from nature conservation, is part of the development blueprint that Ken Chih-you has for Penglai: “We want to restore the culture of traditional Saisiyat dwelling houses, and with beekeeping underpinning the eco­system, the Saisayat communities around Mt. Jiali are the ideal location for developing ecotourism.”

“It’s very touching to see indigenous communities like Sakur that want to pursue environmental education and ecotourism.” HFDO director Yang Jui-fen notes that beekeeping is the best evidence that a village is eco-friendly. Moreover, by linking the com­mun­ity with forestry production, diverse industries can flourish. Developing the underforest economy is a bottom-­­up approach to revitalizing the economy in mountain villages while also protecting the environment, so that productive economic activity and the ecology can co­exist. This is the core spirit of the Satoyama Initiative.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

生產與生態的平衡

林下經濟的出擊

文‧曾蘭淑 圖‧林格立

森林裡的植物豐富多樣,在林下養蜂,可以提供充裕的蜜源,蜜蜂又可提高林木結實率;培育段木香菇、養雞,讓林農可以有額外收入來撫育造林;也因為不干擾林木、不施灑農藥與化肥的堅持,還可在美麗豐饒的森林中發展生態旅遊。

此次,《光華》編輯團隊走訪了南庄蓬萊社區與花蓮撒固兒部落,他們從事林下經濟的努力,正勾勒出生活、生產與生態共存的里山倡議雛型。


趨車繞著蜿蜒山路,來到被加里山脈、鹿場大山環繞的苗栗南庄蓬萊社區,水氣氤氳、雲霧繚繞,氣溫比平地又降了幾度,感覺已位於深山之中,但此地海拔才500公尺。

出身巴卡山蓬萊社區的長老根誌優,兩年來,帶領賽夏族人從事林下經濟,從一開始9個蜂箱,發展至12個蜂場、350個蜂箱,累積至今已採售1,300台斤的蜂蜜,還有養雞、種植段木香菇,並將經驗拓展至高雄市桃源、花蓮縣豐濱、屏東縣瑪家等部落。

山林守得住,就有機會

曾是拍攝東森電視節目「台灣部落尋奇」的導演,走遍原鄉,同時也是原住民議事聯盟理事長的根誌優發現,自己的家鄉最沒有資源、最窮。但他卻很自豪地說:「我們一塊地都沒有賣給漢人,保留了完整的山林。」

「但過去林務局的政策是不能碰林地內的一草一木。」根誌優不禁拉大嗓門說:「我小時候,部落族人都叫林務局為『阿問』(意即魔鬼),因為原住民保留地與林班地毗鄰,砍一根木頭就觸法,與林務局有很多衝突。」

2018年,林務局與賽夏族簽署宣告和解的夥伴關係,2019年基於共管山林的理念,又進一步委託賽夏族人成立「森力軍」巡守隊,在大湳林道、蓬萊林道與加里山巡守,防制盜採山林的「山老鼠」,同時進行刈草與環境維護的工作,一方面可提供當地工作機會外,也讓遊客有更好的登山體驗。

當時林務局長林華慶提到「林下經濟」計畫,指示林業試驗所與各分處,開發適合林下發展的森林副產品,初期擬種植段木香菇、養蜂等,來增加林農與山村居民的收入。

局長一席話點醒夢中人,「養蜂本來就是我們賽夏族生活的一部份,每家每戶都有一個蜂箱,但是卅年來因為生活的改變,不再養蜂。」根誌優接著說:「在林下發展產業,最吸引我的就是不破壞生態,第二可以運用生態的資源增加部落的產值。」

2018年根誌優召集了部落九位鄉親(他稱為家人,因為牽來牽去都有親戚關係),先至明德養蜂場上課,新竹林管處提供疏伐的林木,讓他們自釘蜂箱,每人從一箱蜂箱開始,目前已擴展至12個蜂場,遍及新竹縣五峰鄉、苗栗縣獅潭鄉等賽夏族的範圍,2019年養蜂班已達百萬元的收入。

透過與中興大學合作,提供中興紅羽雞,放養在半開放的山林中,這種台灣原種土雞抗病力強,肉質彈Q,一隻公雞售價可以達650元,蓬萊社區亦成立養雞班來共同銷售。

因為是深山偏鄉,部落裡缺少工作機會,林下經濟也帶來振興山村經濟的機會。蓬萊村村長章潘三妹統計:「我們成立林下經濟產銷的合作社,目前有50多人參加,不只每月有新人加入,而且吸引年輕人願意回部落協助。」

40歲的根靖慧便是一例。五年前,為了照顧住在大湳、卻不願下山就醫的奶奶,她辭去在長庚醫院護士的工作回鄉。

「但要留在部落真的很難,打零工不穩定。」根靖慧試著幫忙家裡長輩種短期蔬菜、桂竹筍。一年前,她接下爸爸根阿榮養蜂的工作,用心投入,從1箱變20箱。縱使今(2020)年冬天遇到三次零下三度的低溫,蜂箱減成14箱,根靖慧卻堅定地說:「我養蜂養得很開心,以前照顧的是病人;現在照顧的是健康的蜜蜂,牠們所展現生命與活力很不同。我覺得林下經濟可以讓我在部落好好的立足。」

為全民造林找出路

其實林務局早在2016年成立「林下經濟」推動小組,由於林業政策轉向生態保育的潮流,林務局鬆綁廿多年來的禁伐政策,並且在提升國產林木自給率政策的加持下,「林下經濟」便是林下多元輔導方案之一。

然而發展林下經濟,除了呼應森林生態共生與提升產業產值的國際趨勢,其實是為廿年前的「全民造林運動」找出路。

原來,1996年賀伯颱風橫掃台灣帶來重災情,土石流引發許多林地崩塌,林務局為了復育土地,以補助獎勵「全民造林」,20多年來,小樹苗已長成大樹,卻面臨林業沒落、林農收益低的困境,連帶影響人工林的撫育與管理。

林務局花蓮林區管理處(簡稱「花蓮林管處」)作業課課長邱煌升指出,對於胸高直徑達40公分以上的台灣櫸、烏心石,為高經濟價值的可造之材,可以繼續培育成大樹。但對於胸徑15公分以下的「資材」,由於利用價值低,常被大盤商以一噸(約三棵楓香樹)900元收購,等於一棵種了20年的樹才300元,十分辛酸。

尤其是花蓮種植2,000公頃的楓香等樹,花蓮林管處2017年4月開始,以南華林業園區作為推廣林下經濟的教育基地,研究將含醣量高、木質素高的楓香、青剛櫟與相思樹,開發成為段木來種香菇,以及在林下養蜂。

養蜂:生態環境的試劑

自行拜師學藝來輔導林農的花蓮林管處課長邱煌升與技士呂坤旺,從做中學,初期段木香菇遇到植菌失敗的問題,沒有種出香菇,卻種出青黴菌;但在第二年成功率達百分之百。養蜂卻遇到難題,某天發現,蜂箱旁小蜜蜂屍橫遍野,遭到中華大虎頭蜂來抄家滅族。

邱煌升解釋,台灣共有七種虎頭蜂,其他六種虎頭蜂都是飛過來,抓走一隻小蜜蜂就走人,但是體型最大的中華大虎頭蜂,卻會用它的大顎把整個蜂槽咬破,讓其他同伴來把裡面的蜜蜂全殺死,為的是吃光蜂箱裡的蜂蛹與花蜜。

為了防制這種「恐怖份子」,他們先在蜂箱外裝上防護網,但虎頭蜂卻直接趴在網子上,虎視眈眈地盯著小蜜蜂,讓小蜜蜂們不敢出門採蜜。上網、找書皆找不到有效方法,問職業養蜂人,最後才透露都是用農藥來毒殺虎頭蜂。

但友善環境是林下經濟首要價值,最後反而是「誤打誤撞」找到解方。

在水璉合作社旁有個工寮,有次把蜂箱移入有多個窗戶的工寮內,呂坤旺發現,小蜜蜂可以選擇任何一個窗戶飛出去採蜜,中華大虎頭蜂繞一繞,等得不耐煩就走了。因此工作人員將蜂場模擬成一座工寮,在蜂場外架設防護網,每格網孔的大小約0.8公分,讓蜜蜂出得去,虎頭蜂進不來,解決了虎頭蜂造成的威脅,也印證了「上天給人一份困難時,同時也給人一份智慧」的話。

南華園區遍植台灣櫸、楓香、白千層等樹種,小蜜蜂所採集的森林蜜,微酸是其特色,尤其是五顏六色的花粉,黑色的花粉來自苦楝樹、雞屎藤;菊色是咸豐草;白色花粉可以判定是小蜜蜂飛至三公里的稻田與芭樂園所採集而來,正是大自然森林的味道。

然而像中華大虎頭蜂如此殘暴的殺手,卻比不上農藥對蜜蜂的危害。呂坤旺說,當小蜜蜂採蜜的飛行途中,遇到附近檳榔林或菜園開始噴藥,好不容易飛回來的蜜蜂,在蜂箱內外「壯烈成仁」堆成一堆小山。所以說,養蜂是檢測森林生態系最好的指標。

回復社區活力

原本山村勞動力缺乏、人力老化是偏鄉山林共同的問題。以培育段木香菇為例,在段木上鑽孔植菌後,要將4噸約150根的段木,在坡地上堆疊、翻、豎直、推倒,導致部份年事已高的林農,由於勞力無法負荷,對種香菇興趣缺缺。但林務局工作人員在學習培育香菇的過程中,意外接觸到全省的菇農,藉此媒合水璉合作社以含運費一噸5500元價格直售木頭給菇農(以前交給大盤是一噸900元),2019年就賣了62噸,也因此提升林農的收入。

然而南華園區2019年3月卻接到來自撒固兒部落的一通電話,他們經林務局長林華慶與理事長根誌優的介紹,想要來養蜂。

從此,20多位平均60歲以上,來自阿美族、布農族與撒奇萊雅族議事聯盟的成員,包含五位頭目,每週三來到花蓮南華園區學養蜂。台東縣海端鄉前鄉長、80歲的胡金娘遠從海端、78歲的張成重頭目從花蓮縣玉里鄉,早上六點出發到花蓮市來上課,也讓指導老師技士呂坤旺感動不已。

花蓮撒固兒部落的前頭目辜木的提供土地,讓學員放置蜂箱、種段木香菇,成員們輪流排班、共同照顧,撰寫值日紀錄,在LINE群組分享蜜蜂近況。被叮、送急診乃兵家常事,遇到蜂王帶著蜜蜂集體出走,想放棄時彼此鼓勵,一年下來,從15個蜂箱增至近百箱,甚至吸引花蓮縣萬榮鄉、台東縣海端鄉等社區前來觀摩。

成員們還成立「花蓮縣原住民生態產業推廣協會」推廣林下經濟,戲稱自己是一群「蜂老人」,把小蜜蜂當成「寵物」養,卻也證明了林下經濟可以是「很療癒的樂齡產業」。

生態旅遊,振興山村經濟

教授撒奇萊雅族語、身兼推廣協會理事長辜木的語重深長地說:「我們帶頭養蜂,是希望發展部落的產業,甚至每一家都有一個蜂箱,讓部落的年輕人看到,把他們的心帶回來,交棒傳承,把他們留在部落。」

成員之一、原民會前處長林進福與撒固兒部落頭目徐從不約而同地說:「林下經濟是友善土地的政策,養蜂可以變成生態教室,提供鄰近學校教學的觀摩,結合附近的撒固兒瀑布與步道、野菜市集,也可以發展生態旅遊。」

兼顧保育與生計的生態旅遊,也是根誌優為蓬萊社區所描繪的發展藍圖。他指著素有小百岳之稱的加里山說:「這片廣闊的山林是我們賽夏族的聖地,也是水源地,這裡有百年砍伐樟樹熬製樟腦的遺址、日治時期的水圳古道、伐木的木馬古道,同時也是賽夏族成年禮考驗的場域,還有超過百年的牛樟樹。我們想恢復賽夏傳統的家屋文化,加上有養蜂作為環境生態系的基礎,賽夏秘境是發展生態旅遊的絕佳地點。」

「撒固兒等部落想要做環境教育、生態旅遊的初衷令人感動。」花蓮林管處處長楊瑞芬指出,養蜂正是生態村最好的證明,由社區出發,連結林木生產,發展出多元產業,這種由下而上所發展的林下經濟,可以振興山村經濟,又能做到生態保護,讓生產與生態共存,而這也是「里山倡議」的精神。

生産と生態のバランス

—— 「林下経済」がもたらす希望

文・曾蘭淑 写真・林格立 翻訳・山口 雪菜

森林の中は植物が豊富かつ多様で、その中で蜂を飼えばミツバチは豊富な花の蜜を採ることができ、またミツバチによって植物の受粉を助けることもできる。シイタケの原木栽培や養蜂など、森林に糧を求める農家は、収入の一部を投じて林の手入れをして造林し、また農薬や肥料も使わないことによって、美しく豊かな森林でのエコツーリズムを発展させることもできる。

今回、「光華」の取材班は、苗栗県南庄屋の蓬莱地域と花蓮県の撒固児集落を訪ね、それぞれの「林下経済」への取り組みを取材した。そこで目にしたのは、まさに生活と生産、生態が共存する「里山イニシアチブ」のひな型だった。


曲がりくねった山道を進み、加里山脈と鹿場大山に囲まれた苗栗県南庄の蓬莱地域に到着した。霧が立ち込め、気温は平地より数度低く、高山のように思えるが、標高は500メートルだ。

巴卡山蓬莱地域出身の長老である根誌優は、この2年、サイシャット族を率いて「林下経済」に取り組んできた。最初は養蜂箱9つから始め、今は12の養蜂場に350の巣箱を設置しており、これまでに累計780キロのハチミツを採取してきた。さらに養鶏やシイタケの原木栽培を行ない、これらの経験を高雄市桃源や花蓮県豊浜、屏東県瑪家などの集落へも広めている。

山林を守ることが機会につながる

かつて東森テレビで先住民集落を紹介する番組「台湾部落尋奇」のディレクターとして台湾各地を巡り、原住民議事連盟の理事長も務める根誌優は、自分の故郷はどこよりもリソースが乏しく、貧しいことに気づいた。だが、「私たちはわずかな土地も漢民族に売ることなく、完全な山林を守ってきました」と誇らしそうに語る。

「しかし、かつて林務局の政策は林地内の木一本、草一本にも触れてはならないというものでした」と根誌優は声を大きくする。「私が子供の頃、集落の人々は林務局を『阿問』(魔物の意味)と呼んでいました。というのも、原住民保留地と林班地は隣り合っていて、間違って木を一本でも切ろうものなら違法とされて、問題が絶えなかったのです」と言う。

2018年、林務局とサイシャット族は和解を意味するパートナー宣言に署名を交わした。2019年には山林共同管理の理念に基づき、サイシャット族が委託されてパトロール隊「森林軍」を結成し、大湳林道と蓬莱林道、加里山をパトロールすることになった。違法伐採を防止し、森林の環境を整備するためで、住民の就労機会にもなった。

そして当時の林務局長・林華慶が「林下経済」プランを打ち出した。「林下経済」とは、森林の副産物であるシイタケの原木栽培や養蜂によって山地住民の収入を増やそうというもので、林業試験所や林務局の各分処にこれを指示した。

これが山地に暮らす人々の目を覚ました。「養蜂はもともと私たちサイシャット族の生活の一部で、どの家にも巣箱が一つありましたが、この30年、暮らしが変わり誰も養蜂をしていなかったのです。林下の産業を発展させるという計画は、自然環境を破壊したくない私たちを惹きつけ、自然生態を活用して集落の生産高を上げられることに魅力を感じました」と根誌優は言う。

2018年、根誌優は集落の9人の住民(彼は家族と呼ぶ。皆どこかで血がつながっているから)を集め、まず明徳養蜂場へ研修を受けに行った。新竹の林区管理処が伐採した木材で巣箱を手作りし、一人一箱から開始した。それが現在は12の養蜂場が新竹県五峰郷と苗栗県獅潭郷のサイシャット族が暮らすエリアに広がり、2019年に養蜂班の収入は100万元に達した。

山深く雇用の少ない集落に、林下経済が新たなチャンスをもたらした。「林下経済の生産販売組合には現在50名が参加し、毎月新人が加わるだけでなく、若い人も集落へ戻ってくるようになりました」と蓬莱村村長の章潘三妹は言う。

40歳の根靖慧もそうした中の一人だ。山に暮らす祖母の世話をするために長庚病院の看護師の仕事を辞めて戻ってきたが、ここに雇用はない。そこで父の養蜂を引き継ぎ、1つだった巣箱は20まで増え、生計を立てられるようになった。

全民造林の後を受けて

実は林務局では2016年に「林下経済」推進チームを設けていた。林業政策が生態保全へと向かう中、林務局は20余年来続けてきた伐採禁止政策を緩和し、国産木材の自給率を向上させることとなり、その中で「林下経済」が森林周辺の指導プランの一つとされたのである。

林下経済は、森林の自然生態との共生と産業生産高向上という世界の趨勢に対応した政策であると同時に、20年前の「全民造林運動」の後を受けての対策でもあった。

1996年の台風9号が台湾各地に甚大な災害をもたらした。各地で土石流が発生して山林が崩落し、林務局では土地を回復させるために補助金を出して「全民造林」を奨励したのである。それから20年余り、当時植えた木の苗は大きく育ったのだが、林業は衰退して収入も減り、造林地の手入れや維持にも影響が出ていた。

特に花蓮では2000ヘクタールにフウの木などを植えたが、花蓮林区管理処では2017年4月から、華南林業園区を「林下経済」の教育基地とし、フウ、オーク、ソウシジュなど、糖質とリグニンの含有量が多い樹木を研究し、それを使ったシイタケ栽培と養蜂を推進することとなった。

養蜂:生態環境の試薬

自ら師事して学び、それを農家に教えている花蓮林区管理処課長の邱煌升と技士の呂坤旺は、学びながら林下経済を実践してきた。最初にシイタケを栽培した時は、植菌に失敗して青カビが生えてしまったが、2年目には100%成功した。養蜂も難題に直面した。ある日、巣箱の周囲にミツバチがたくさん死んでいるのが見つかったのである。オオスズメバチの仕業だった。

邱煌升によると、台湾には7種類のスズメバチがいて、他の6種類はミツバチを1匹さらっていくだけだが、最も大きなオオスズメバチは多数でミツバチの巣を襲い、巣の中の蛹や蜜を喰い尽くしてしまうのである。

これを防ぐために、彼らは養蜂箱の周囲を防護網で覆ってみたが、オオスズメバチは網に止まって狙い続けるため、ミツバチは巣から出られなくなってしまう。ネットや本で調べたが良い方法は見つからず、プロの養蜂家に聞くと、スズメバチを農薬で殺しているということだった。

だが、これでは環境にやさしい林下経済にはならない。何とかしようとあらゆる方法を試しているうちに、ようやく解決方法がみつかった。

水璉組合の近くに作業小屋があり、試しにその小屋の中に巣箱を置いてみた。するとミツバチは窓の隙間から蜜を採りに出ていけるが、スズメバチは周囲を飛び回った後、あきらめて去っていくことがわかった。そこで彼らは養蜂場の周囲に目が8ミリの防護網を張り巡らすことにした。こうするとミツバチは出入りできるがオオスズメバチは入ることができないのである。

オオスズメバチは大きな脅威だが、ミツバチへの危害という点では農薬の方が恐ろしい。呂坤旺によると、ミツバチが蜜を採りに行った時、周囲のビンロウ林や畑で農薬を散布していると、巣箱の外がミツバチの死骸の山となってしまうのである。このことからも、ミツバチは森林生態の指標と言えるのである。

コミュニティの力を回復

人手不足と高齢化は山村に共通する問題である。シイタケの原木栽培を行なうにしても、ほだ木にシイタケ菌を打ち付けた後、150本、4トンものほだ木を斜面に並べ、向きを変えたりしなければならない。だが、高齢者には肉体的に困難なため、これをやろうという人は少ない。そこで、林務局はシイタケ栽培を学ぶ過程で知り合った台湾各地のシイタケ農家と水璉組合をつなぎ、原木をシイタケ農家に1トン5500元(それまでは卸商に1トン900元で卸していた)で直接販売することにした。2019年には62トンが販売でき、これにより住民の収入も増えた。

そんな中、華南園区は2019年3月、撒固児集落からの電話を受けた。林務局長の林華慶と理事長の根誌優の紹介で、養蜂をやりたいと言ってきたのである。

以来、アミ族、ブヌン族、それにサキザヤ族の平均年齢60歳以上の20名が、毎週水曜日に花蓮の華南園区に養蜂を学びに来るようになった。台東県海瑞郷の郷長や、80歳になる胡金娘、花蓮県玉里郷に暮らす78歳の頭目・張成重も、朝6時に家を出て花蓮市まで学びに来るのを見て、呂坤旺は大いに感動した。

花蓮県の撒固児集落の元頭目である辜木的が、メンバーに巣箱やシイタケ栽培の原木を置く土地を提供し、メンバーは交替でそれらの世話をして当直日誌を書き、LINEのグループでミツバチの状況を報告しあった。ハチに刺されて急いで病院へ行くことも日常茶飯事だし、女王バチが働きバチを連れて出ていってしまうこともあったが、互いに励まし合って続けてきた。そうして一年、最初は15個だった巣箱も100近くになり、花蓮県の万栄郷や台東県海瑞郷からも見学者が訪れるようになった。

このメンバーはさらに「花蓮県原住民生態産業推広協会」を結成して林下経済を推進している。自らを「蜂老人」と称する彼らは、ミツバチをペットとして飼いつつ、林下経済で高齢者も楽しく暮らせることを証明してきた。

エコツーリズムで経済振興

サキザヤ語の先生であり、同推広協会の理事長でもある辜木的はこう話す。「私たちが先頭に立って養蜂を始めたのは、集落の産業を発展させたいと考えたからです。一家に一つずつ巣箱があるようにすれば、若者たちもこれを見て気持ちが変わり、集落に残って引き継いでくれるかもしれません」

メンバーの一人で、原住民族委員会の元処長でもある林進福と、撒固児集落の頭目・徐従は口をそろえてこう話す。「林下経済は自然環境にやさしい政策で、養蜂産業は生態教室として活かすこともでき、近隣の学校の課外授業になります。これに撒固児瀑布や遊歩道、野菜市場などを組み合わせれば、エコツーリズムへと発展させることも可能でしょう」

生態保全とエコツーリズムを両立させるというのは、根誌優が描く蓬莱地域の青写真でもある。彼は加里山を指差してこう語る。「この広大な山林は私たちサイシャット族の聖地であり、水源地でもあります。ここにはクスノキを伐採して樟脳を精製した工場の跡地や、日本統治時代の用水路古道、森林伐採のための木馬古道などがあり、またサイシャット族が成年となる試験を行なう場所もあります。私たちはサイシャット族の伝統家屋を復活させ、養蜂によって生態系を守り、この秘境をエコツーリズムの場として発展させたいと考えています」

「撒固児などの集落で、環境教育やエコツーリズムを発展させたいという考えには感動させられます」と花蓮林区管理処処長の楊瑞芬は言う。養蜂はまさにエコ・ビレッジであることの証明となる。地域からスタートして、木材生産と合わせて多様な産業を発展させる。このようなボトムアップで発展する「林下経済」は山村経済を振興させると同時に自然保護にもつながり、生産と生態を共存させる。これこそ「里山イニシアチブ」の精神そのものなのである。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!