Pottery from the Imagination

Indonesian Ceramicist Tjung Seha
:::

2020 / June

Sharleen Su /photos courtesy of Jimmy Lin /tr. by Geof Aberhart


Tjung Seha originally hails from a Hakka village in Kalimantan, Indonesia. After marrying and moving to Taiwan, she began learning pottery from her father-in-law, master potter Hsieh Fa-chang. Through observation and her keen mind, Tjung learned to shape large urns. Optimistic and hardworking by nature, she single-handedly revived her in-laws’ pottery workshop, bringing new life to a family business that had been on the verge of closure.


In 1999, a young and eager Hsieh Chi-lung flew to Kalimantan, Indonesia to take a wife. “We actually met then, through a matchmaker.” First thing in the morning, Tjung Seha is busily shuttling in and out of the pottery workshop, while her husband Hsieh Chi-lung is in charge of kneading the clay. As the machinery inside moves at high speed, mixing and stirring the clay that is about to be thrown, husband and wife work together like a well-oiled machine themselves.

Twenty years ago, Tjung, a Chinese-Indonesian who couldn’t speak a word of Mandarin, married Hsieh Chi-lung, who is from Gongguan in Taiwan’s Miaoli County. Talking about how they met, Tjung can’t help but laugh as she recalls how Hsieh had already had matchmaking meetings with more than 20 women before her. Hearing her self-deprecating comment, Hsieh laughs too, adding, “It was her dimples that drew me in.”

Since marrying, the two have enjoyed a loving relationship, raising three children together. Tjung has thoroughly integrated into Taiwanese society, even mastering Mandarin in her first year here. After the birth of their first child, Tjung began to study pottery-­making, ultimately becoming the capable boss of the workshop Lo Ba Living Pottery. When she first arrived in Taiwan, Tjung hung around in the workshop every day and watched her father-in-law, Hsieh Fa-chang, at work. The elder Hsieh is a well-­established master potter and whenever he threw a pot, Tjung would help with keeping it wet. “It used to be that my father-in-law did it all by himself, everything from the glazing to stacking the kiln and firing it.” As she helped her father-in-law out, Tjung gradually gained an understanding of every step of his process.

“They say it’s the same as kneading dough. My mom made choi pan to sell, so we’d be kneading dough ­every day.” Tjung Seha was born into an under­privileged family and grew up helping her mother make choi pan (steamed vegetable dumplings) alongside her siblings. Kneading clay every day is much like those days for her, and now making pottery is how she helps support her family, just as her mother did by making choi pan. “When I first came over, I was there every day but I didn’t really know how to do anything. I wasn’t trying to learn, I just wanted to help.” As a child, Tjung was taught that “if you want to eat, you have to help,” and this was a big part of what drove her to do her part to help out her hardworking father-in-law.

Throwing pottery with imagination

During her postpartum rest month after the birth of her first child, Tjung spent every day throwing pots in her mind; “I used my imagination to practice shaping the clay on the potter’s wheel, no lie!” Once that time was up, the first thing she did was head straight into the studio and throw her first piece, a ceramic mortar.

At first the elder Hsieh wasn’t especially impressed by his daughter-in-law’s work, but he soon found that the more she did, the bigger her work got, and eventually a customer remarked to him, “Wow, your daughter-­in-law is really good at this!” It was then that he realized he had found a successor.

Miaoli has a wealth of clay and natural gas, which is what created the flourishing pottery industry there. During its heyday, Gongguan alone was home to some three or four hundred pottery factories. Tjung Seha’s father-in-law Hsieh Fa-chang is particularly talented at making large urns, and even before he would fire his kiln, customers would already be snapping up the finished products sight unseen.

By the time Tjung married into the family, though, Miaoli’s pottery industry was already on the other side of those prosperous days, with only five or six factories left. With prospects dim for the industry and Hsieh Fa-chang’s sizable urns requiring so much time and effort to make, even his own son wasn’t interested in taking over the reins.

A natural talent

When firing these large urns, one must be careful with moisture levels, which are affected by the weather—if the clay is too dry, it will be more susceptible to cracking, but if it’s too moist, it will be prone to collapsing. Finding that balance requires experience. Neither Hsieh could have expected that a young woman from Indonesia would have a natural talent for making pottery like this. Hsieh Chi-lung is effusive in his praise for his wife, saying, “It’s like she was born for this work.” Once she joined in, the workshop’s production grew almost immediately. She could work faster on her own than two ordinary workers together, so customers could feel assured that their orders would be ready in time. As a result, business began to stabilize. “If it hadn’t been for my wife taking this up, this place might have closed long ago,” says Hsieh Chi-lung.

Succeeding through hard work

Tjung has a naturally pleasant personality, and when customers call, they’ll often ask for her by name, even asking Hsieh Chi-lung to put her on the phone if he answers. Some customers also come in to buy pre-made product, and Tjung is just as good as a sales­person as she is as a potter. She is deeply familiar with all the studio’s products and eagerly uses this knowledge to sell customers on them: “We don’t make urns with a pattern like this often—I can’t guarantee we’ll have any next time!”

The whole family is involved in pottery-making, and when she goes out, Tjung will take some modeling clay with her and take impressions of any beautiful patterns she encounters. “For example, I like to go out to the markets and check out some cheap shoes. Other people try them on, but I flip them over and check out the patterns on the soles, and if they look good, I’ll pay the NT$100 and take them home with me.” The impressions she takes can then be made into tools that are used to make one-of-a-kind patterns on the pottery. This has become a secret weapon in Tjung’s family ­arsenal.

Significant karma

The capable Tjung Seha not only is a pillar of the family business, but also runs the household too. Making pottery, raising kids, running the workshop, taking orders, doing the bookkeeping, going to the bank... there’s almost nothing she can’t do. “I’m a jack of all trades here,” she jokes. To get a wife who is such a great mother and keeps the family going with her pottery, Hsieh Chi-lung must have accrued some pretty significant karma.

Having achieved some prosperity for her family through her pottery work, Tjung now also wants to pass her skills on to another generation, and as an immigrant from Southeast Asia, she says, “I particularly want to teach the kids of my fellow Southeast-Asian immigrants.” It seems like the century-old fires of Miaoli’s pottery industry are in good hands with Tjung Seha.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

日本語 繁體

イメージで陶器をつくる

新住民陶芸家——鍾細霞

文・蘇晨瑜 写真・林格立 翻訳・山口 雪菜

インドネシア、カリマンタンの客家集落から台湾に嫁いできた鍾細霞は、舅で陶芸家の謝発章の傍らで陶器造りを学んできた。聡明な彼女は見よう見まねで舅の甕造りの技術を習得した。楽観的で勤勉な彼女は、その腕で謝家の工房を引き継ぐこととなり、廃業する予定だった工場に新たな生気をもたらすこととなった。


1999年、若くて血気盛んだった謝祺龍はインドネシアのカリマンタンにある客家集落へ結婚相手を探しに行った。「私たちは、その時の見合いで出会いました」と言う。

台湾へ嫁いできたインドネシア出身の鍾細霞は早朝から工房で忙しくしている。夫の謝祺龍は土を練る工程を担当しており、工房内の機械が高速で回転し、成形前の土が練られている。

20年前、中国語を一言も話せなかったインドネシア華僑の鍾細霞は、苗栗県公館の謝祺龍のもとへ嫁いできた。出会った頃の話になると、鍾細霞は笑いながら、「彼にとって私は20何人目かのお見合い相手だったんですよ」と言い、夫は少し怒ったような顔をして「彼女の笑窪に惹かれたんですよ」と照れる。

この仲の良い夫婦は3人の子供を育ててきた。鍾細霞は早くから台湾社会にとけ込み、中国語も一年足らずで流暢に話せるようになった。一人目の子供を産んでからは自分で陶器造りの技術を学び始め、工房「老祺爸生活陶」の有能な女将さんになった。嫁いできたばかりの頃は、毎日工房に入り、舅の謝発章の作業を見ていた。謝発章は苗栗県公館では知られた陶芸職人で、轆轤を回す時には鍾細霞が傍らで水を垂らして手伝った。「舅はすべて一人でやっていました。釉薬掛けも窯入れも、焼成もすべて自分でやっていました」と言う。それを傍らで手伝っているうちに、彼女は次第に謝発章の仕事の要領を理解していった。

「小麦粉を練るのと同じだと言います。母は団子を作っていたので毎日練っていました」鍾細霞の実家は貧しく、母親が団子を売って子供たちを育て上げた。今は毎日土を練り、母親と同じようにこれで一家を支えている。「嫁いできたばかりの頃は本当に何もできなくて、技術を学ぼうというのではなく、ただ手伝いたかっただけです」と言う。子供の頃から「ご飯が食べたければ手伝うこと」が習慣だった。客家人特有の勤勉さから、舅が一人で陶器を作っているのを見ていられず、少しでも手伝いたいと思ったのだ。

想像力を活かして成形

一人目の子供を産んで一ヶ月、鍾細霞は毎日頭の中で陶器の成形をイメージしていた。「イメージだけで甕の形を作っていたんです」と言う。出産から40日後、最初にやったのが轆轤を使った成形で、初めての鉢を完成させた。

想像力で轆轤成形を成功させた後、高齢の舅が大きな甕を作るのは大変だと感じた彼女は、舅には小型の器を作ってもらい、大きな甕は自分が作ることにした。そして毎日全身泥だらけになりながら努力した。

舅の謝発章は、この次男の嫁がどんどん上手になり、作れる甕もしだいに大きくなるのを目の当たりにしていたが、ある日、取引先から「おや、お嫁さんも出来るじゃないか」と言われ、初めて後継者ができたことに気づいたという。

謝家の工房は、苗栗県の窯業の盛衰を見守ってきた。「私が小学生の頃は、ここは台湾最大の窯業地区で、鶯歌より大きかったのですよ」苗栗には豊富な粘土と天然ガスがあることから窯業が盛んになり、全盛期には公館に製陶所が300軒以上あった。謝発章は大型の甕が得意で、以前は窯を開ける前に注文で売り切れた。

だが、鍾細霞が嫁いできた頃には、工場は5~6軒しか残っておらず、息子も後を継ごうとしなくなっていた。

天性の陶器職人

大型の甕を作る時は天気に注意しなければならない。土が乾きすぎると亀裂が入り、湿度が高いと形が崩れてしまう。その感覚は経験だけが頼りとなる。それが、インドネシアから来た次男の嫁には才能があり、大型の甕を上手に作る。「女房は生まれながらの職人ですよ」と夫の謝祺龍が言う通り、彼女が加わったことで工房の生産能力はすぐに高まり、顧客も安心して注文を出せるようになって経営も安定した。「妻が継いでくれなかったら、うちの工房はとっくに廃業していたでしょう」と謝祺龍は言う。

有能な鍾細霞は天性の感覚で陶芸を習得し、舅は特別な指導はしなかったという。例えば急須の注ぎ口や柄の部分も、鍾細霞が成形したものを舅がチェックするだけですぐに窯に入れられる。夫の謝祺龍の方は成形の技術は彼女ほどではない。「夫はネットを参考にしていて、私たちのやり方はできないんですよ」と話す鍾細霞によると、一家3人の成形方法はそれぞれ異なるという。謝祺龍は「私はいつも一定の高さまで来ると、それ以上いけなくなるんです」と言い、舅は「嫁の方が腕がいいよ」と言う。三世代同居する家族の間には笑い声が絶えない。

勤倹で家を支える

鍾細霞は人に好かれるさっぱりした性格で、顧客からの電話も彼女宛てにかかってくる。客が工房で陶器を選んでいる時も彼女が接客し、「この模様は珍しいので、次回はないかも知れませんよ」と説明しながら商品を勧める。

一家全員が陶器造りに携わっており、鍾細霞は出かける時も陶土を持って行って、気に入った模様があると土で型を取る。「市場で安い靴を見つけ、靴底の模様が気に入ると買って帰ります」と言う。靴底や貝殻、花びらなどの型は陶器造りの道具になり、これを押せば唯一無二の模様ができるのである。

インドネシアから嫁いできて右も左もわからなかったのが、今では一家の支えとなり、先生と呼ばれる陶芸家となった。注文が少ない時は、夫婦そろって芸術家魂を発揮し、芸術作品を制作して展覧会に出す。夫婦協同で制作した作品の一つは、鍾細霞が作った部分は「女」、謝祺龍が作った部分は「男」という名前で、二人はさまざまな素材や色を試みる。

土をいじるお嫁さん

台湾に嫁いできた彼女は、故郷の友人から「台湾で何をしているの?」と聞かれると、いつも「土をいじっている」と答える。だが、彼女が育ったインドネシアの客家集落では陶器職人の社会的地位は低く、なぜ台湾に行ってまで陶器をつくるのかといぶかしがられたが、長年の努力を経て今は現地の人々の意識も変わってきた。

しっかり者の鍾細霞は、工房の中心的存在であるだけでなく、一家の支えでもある。陶器を作り、子供を育て、工場を経営し、新しい顧客を開拓し、帳簿をつけ、銀行にも行く。一日が終わって家に帰れば夕食を作って皆に食べさせる。朝から晩まで休む暇もない。謝祺龍は素晴らしい縁に恵まれたと言えるだろう。

陶器造りで夫の家を盛り立ててきた鍾細霞は、海外から嫁いできた母親として、自分の技術を子供たちの代に引き継ぎたいと考えている。「同じ東南アジアから嫁いできた女性の子供たちにも陶器造りを学んでほしいと思っています」と言う。百年の歴史を持つ苗栗の窯業は、鍾細霞の手によって受け継がれていくのかも知れない。

用想像力做陶

新住民陶藝家──鍾細霞

文‧蘇晨瑜 圖‧林格立

來自印尼加里曼丹客家庄的台灣媳婦鍾細霞,嫁到台灣後跟在公公老陶師謝發章身邊學做陶。聰慧的她藉由觀摩,學會了公公做大甕的技術,天性樂觀又勤奮的她,一手撐起謝家的陶工房,讓本來要收掉的工廠再創生機。


1999年,年輕氣盛的謝祺龍大老遠飛到印尼的加里曼丹客家庄去討老婆。「我們兩個就是那個時候相親認識的。」一大清早,嫁來台灣的印尼媳婦鍾細霞在製陶廠裡忙進忙出,先生謝祺龍則負責練土,工廠內的機器正在高速運轉,攪拌著等會拉胚要用的泥團,夫妻倆裡應外合,展現了充分的默契。

20年前,一句中文都不會說的印尼華人鍾細霞,嫁給了來自苗栗公館的謝祺龍。談到這段相識的過往,鍾細霞忍不住大笑:「我那時是他相親的第20幾個女生吧!」聽到老婆調侃自己,謝祺龍也不以為意,憨笑著說:「當時就是被她的酒窩吸引的。」

婚後夫妻兩人相當恩愛,膝下育有三子,鍾細霞也早已經融入台灣社會,不到一年就已經說得一口流利的中文。生完老大後,鍾細霞更自學了製陶的技術,成為「老爸生活陶」工房中最精明幹練的老闆娘。剛嫁到台灣時,乖巧的鍾細霞每天都待在工廠裡,看著公公謝發章做陶。謝發章是苗栗公館的老陶師,每次做陶拉胚時,孝順的鍾細霞就在旁邊幫忙滴水。「以前看公公都是一個人做啊,上釉、疊窯、燒窯都他自己來。」跟在公公旁邊幫忙久了,耳濡目染,也漸漸看懂了謝發章做陶的每一個步驟。

「他們說這個跟揉麵團一樣,我媽媽是做粿的,也是每天在揉粿。」鍾細霞出身貧寒的家庭,靠著母親做粿拉拔幾個兄弟姊妹長大。現在每天揉土,就像媽媽揉麵粿一樣,靠著做陶養活一家。「我剛來的時候,每天什麼都不會做,真的沒有想要學,只是想要幫忙而已。」鍾細霞從小在娘家習慣「要吃飯就是要幫忙」,客家人特有的勤奮特質,讓她不忍公公一個人辛苦做陶,總是想要幫忙出一點力。

用想像力拉胚

生完老大坐月子的那一個月,鍾細霞每天都在腦海裡演練怎麼拉胚,「我用想像力去練習怎麼把胚拉起來,真的沒騙你!」,40天月子做完後,鍾細霞第一件事就是跑去拉胚,成功做出第一個擂缽。

靠著想像「學會」拉胚後,鍾細霞覺得公公年事已高,做大甕實在很辛苦,就主動搶著做大甕,小型的陶器才讓公公來做。日復一日,鍾細霞每天到工廠拉胚、擠胚,渾身上下都是泥巴。

媳婦在一旁幫忙,一開始謝發章還覺得沒什麼,沒有想到這二媳婦越做越多,甕越做越大,直到有一天客戶跟謝發章說:「哎唷!你媳婦會做會拉了欸!」謝發章這才發現自己有了傳人。

謝家的陶工廠,見證著苗栗陶業的興衰。「我國小的時候,這裡是台灣最大的陶業區,比鶯歌還大。」苗栗擁有豐沛的黏土與天然氣,造就了苗栗陶業的盛況,全盛時期光是公館的製陶工廠就有三到四百家。鍾細霞的公公謝發章擅長做大甕,以前工廠的窯都還沒有打開,客人就已經把產品搶訂一空。

鍾細霞嫁到謝家時,苗栗的陶業早已不敵時代洪流,工廠收到剩下五、六家。陶業沒落後,陶工廠望穿秋水,等客人上門,謝發章拿手的大甕製造技術,費時又費力,連兒子也不想接班。

天生吃陶藝這行飯

做大甕看天氣,燒製大甕時,泥土太乾容易裂,太濕胚體容易垮,介於乾與不乾之間的拿捏,一切都得憑經驗。這種必須細細琢磨與等待的工藝,年輕人沒有幾個想接手,沒有想到來自印尼的二媳婦對做陶是那麼有天份,做大甕特別上手,謝祺龍也忍不住誇讚老婆:「我老婆天生就是吃這行飯的。」有了她加入以後,工廠的產能馬上增加,一個人做比兩個人做還要快,客戶對訂單放心了,工廠的業務也穩定下來。「我老婆如果沒有來接的話,這家工廠恐怕早就關門了。」謝祺龍說。

能幹的鍾細霞做陶完全憑天份,公公其實沒有特別指點。像做茶壺的壺嘴、提把,鍾細霞只是把形狀捏出來,公公看過可以了,就去燒出成品來。謝祺龍半路出家,拉胚技術沒有鍾細霞來得好,拉胚常遇到瓶頸。「我老公大多是參考網路,我們這種方式他不會。」鍾細霞吐槽老公的技術,一家三口拉胚手勢都不一樣,謝祺龍「每次拉到一個高度就卡住了,」讓公公謝發章怨嘆:「他就是笨!」並特別讚嘆媳婦:「她比較會做啦!」一家人同在一個屋簷下,說說笑笑,其樂融融。

勤儉持家有成

鍾細霞個性爽朗,討人喜愛,客戶打電話來,常指名找老闆娘,換謝祺龍接到電話,還會被客戶要求轉接。一些客人來現場選購陶器,鍾細霞就站上第一線接待,自家產品的特性如數家珍,還不忘趁勢推銷一番:「這種紋路的缸很少見,下次來不一定有貨喔!」展現高超的業務能力。

一家都做陶,出門時鍾細霞還會帶著泥土,碰到好看的花紋,就會把紋路拓印下來。「像我很喜歡去市場找鞋子,有些便宜的鞋子人家去試穿,我是拿起來看鞋底的紋路,看到很漂亮,100塊就買回來。」人造的球鞋,海灘上的貝殼、搖曳的花朵,天然人工的紋路處處可見,拓印好的紋路做成製陶的工具,可在陶器上拍打出獨一無二的花紋,成為鍾細霞一家做陶的秘密武器。

從年輕懵懂到幹練持家,人們現在見到鍾細霞都會喊她一聲老師,讚賞這位來自印尼的新住民陶藝家。閒暇不忙訂單時,鍾細霞與夫婿兩人也會爆發一下藝術魂,做些純藝術創作參展。一件夫妻合體創作的陶藝作品,鍾細霞製作的部分名叫〈女人〉,謝祺龍製作的部分名叫〈男人〉,陶藝家總是會想玩玩不同的材質與顏色,夫妻倆也不例外。

玩泥巴的台灣媳婦

嫁到台灣,鍾細霞印尼老家的朋友每次問她:「妳在台灣是做什麼的?」鍾細霞都會回答:「我是玩泥巴的。」聽完後朋友的第一個反應都是相當驚嚇:「妳怎麼做這種低下的工作?」在鍾細霞成長的客家庄,做陶是相當低下的工作,一般印尼女孩嫁到台灣,多數都到工廠去上班,做陶可是比養雞養豬還不如的出路。經過鍾細霞這幾年的努力,才漸漸翻轉當地人的誤解。

能幹的鍾細霞不但撐起了工廠,也撐起了自己的家。做陶、育兒、工廠營運、訂單開發、記帳、跑銀行……,什麼事都做。傍晚回家還要洗洗切切,張羅晚餐,從早忙到晚,一刻不停歇。她開玩笑說:「我是台勞哎!」這位偉大的媽媽,靠著做陶養活一家人,謝祺龍必定是燒了三輩子好香。

用陶藝成就夫家的興旺,鍾細霞身為新住民,也想把自己的技藝傳承給第二代。「我想教育新住民姐妹們的孩子來學做陶。」百年苗栗陶業的薪火,或許可以在鍾細霞的手中,繼續傳遞下去。 

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!