Sharing Cambodian Culture

Enlightening Exchanges
:::

2018 / December

Esther Tseng /photos courtesy of Lin Min-hsuan /tr. by Scott Williams


What is Cambodia’s appeal? What made graphic designer and photographer Hsu Hung ­Chieh sell everything he owned and move there for eight years? What upended cultural studies graduate Lin Chih Yu’s conception of art?

It isn’t just Cambodia’s magnificent 12th-century Angkor Wat temple complex, nor yet its delicate archi­tectural sculpture. Instead, what causes visitors to tarry is the Cambodian people themselves, who, having lived through horrific massacres and cata­strophes, are now working to rebuild their culture and recover the positive aspects of their history.

 


 

Casual and composed, Hsu Hung ­Chieh, a ponytailed photographer with numerous temple bracelets tied around his wrists, tells us: “I like change, but I found a kind of pure ingenuousness and happiness in Cam­bodia’s impoverished environment.”

Sent to Cambodia in 2010 to photograph Angkor Wat for a publisher, he spent his spare time taking tuk-tuks into the countryside to explore rural areas rarely visited by travelers. There he saw at first hand the huge disparity between real Cambodian life and that visible in the areas that tourists visit.

Struck by how content Cambodians seemed to be with their lives in spite of their poverty, he made the radical decision to sell his home and his belongings in Taiwan. “I cut myself free, then came back to Cambodia as a volunteer.”

A home for the heart

Hsu returned to Cambodia in 2010 as an international volunteer with the Formosa Budding Hope Association, while also helping shoot a documentary. He began living in Phnom Penh long term in 2011, supporting himself by running a bed-and-breakfast with just three private rooms and two dormitory-style rooms. He spent eight years in Cambodia, traveling its length and breadth doing field research and documenting the changes taking place with his camera.

Symbodia: A record of things lost

Looking for different sides of Cambodia, Hsu followed the roads wherever they led, visiting town after town and photographing whatever he saw. He traveled the Me­kong River and the banks of ­Tonlé Sap Lake docu­ment­ing traditional festivals like ­Pchum Ben, when Cambodians pay their respects to the dead, and Bon Om Touk, which gives thanks for the end of the rainy season.

Hsu met Cambodians of many different stripes, including survivors of the ­Khmer ­Rouge terror. Hsu says, “The Cambodian intellectuals who weren’t slaughtered fled abroad. The trauma to society of having close friends, relatives and neighbors violently killed left even healthy people despairing of living another day.”

Hsu came to the conclusion that more international aid was pointless unless the country’s young intellectuals began lending their own aid to the recovery effort, and wondered if he might be able to do something to help.

He had met young intellectuals and cultural workers who hadn’t experienced the ­Khmer ­Rouge’s tyranny and who felt a strong sense of mission to preserve their country’s traditional culture. They were attempting to preserve their history through music and documentary film societies, but were dealing with a lack of historical and cultural information, much of which had been destroyed by the war. Their plight convinced Hsu of the import­ance of creating a photographic record of Cambodia.

Cambodian society was undergoing rapid changes, and its efforts to attract foreign money and construction were putting it in danger of losing many of its cultural assets. Hsu noted that no one was documenting the many old homes and temples that were at the heart of city life, but slated to be torn down.

He set about doing so himself, and returned to Taiwan in June of 2018 determined to build a searchable data­base of images and maps from the data and more than 10,000 images he had gathered. He calls the database Sym­bodia. Moving forward, he hopes that other photo­graphers visiting Cambodia will share their photos to help fill in any gaps.

“I’m only one person,” explains Hsu. “Cambodia is so big that I can’t complete this project alone. [Even so] I’m sure that my database will be useful when Cambodia needs this cultural information in the future, because a people can’t reclaim its self-respect without [access to] its culture.”

Passing on traditional culture

Cambodia’s younger generation of artists have a passion­ate desire to pass on their traditional culture. Lin Chih Yu caught the bug while interning with Cambodia’s Am­rita Performing Arts troupe.

As a student in the Cultural Studies and Criticism track in the Graduate Institute of Dance at Tai­pei National University of the Arts, Lin traveled to Cambodia in 2014 to serve an internship with Am­rita as part of her work on her master’s thesis. While organizing documents and performing with the troupe, Lin learned that the 17-member company, which was founded in 2003, not only had a deep grasp of its cultural roots, but also incorporated ­aspects of palace dance, ­Khmer mask-drama dance, and folk dance into its dances. 

Lin observed that in addition to reflecting family and societal relationships in its works, Cambodian modern dance also drew from artists who had survived the war, and incorporated that information into dances that reflect the ­Khmer ­Rouge history that the older generation no longer wanted to talk about. “One dancer of my age was ­really dedicated to supporting the younger dancers, and did her utmost to preserve traditional ­­Khmer dance in hopes of preventing this portion of traditional culture from fading away. Her passion for traditional folk culture was very different from the narrow focus on personal desires that’s so common in Taiwan’s young people.”

Infected by this enthusiasm, Lin was encouraged to become a bridge for exchange between Taiwanese and Southeast-Asian performing arts.

Transnational cultural exchange

Hsu and Lin aren’t the only ones engaging with Cambodian culture.

The National Taiwan College of Performing Arts (NTCPA) invited Danny Yung to direct and host The Inter­rupted Dream · Monkey Business, an attempt to engage tradi­tional performing arts in transregional, cross-cultural dialogue and cooperation that was staged in Taiwan and Hong Kong in October 2018. In one dance segment, called “Heavenly Palace of Monkey Business,” the Cambodian dancer Nget Rady, who specializes in playing the monkey role in traditional ­Khmer mask-drama dance, and ­Chang Yu-chau, who specializes in the Monkey King role in Pe­king Opera, demonstrated aspects of classical Cambodian dance and Pe­king Opera to show students the core and innovations of each traditional dance form.

Rady has performed his wild yet graceful style of dance several times in Taiwan. At the November event, he focused on teaching NTCPA students how to dance the monkey role, in the hope that exploring physical movements and practicing sounds would boost the students’ confidence on stage.

He says: “Even though Taiwan and Cambodia have different political systems and social backgrounds, music and the arts can bridge the differences and connect people.”

Meanwhile, Rotary Taipei Asia Link and a Cambodian group called Artisans Angkor jointly organized the “Art Creation Program.” Under the program, Asia Link donated US$6,000 to help fund a Formosa Budding Hope Association program that pays fine arts teachers from Artisans Angkor to provide drawing classes to impoverished children. The groups also arranged a joint charity bazaar in Taiwan in mid-November.

Artisans Angkor is a non-governmental organization founded in 1992 with funds from the French government. Vidana Kernem, the group’s secretary-general, says that it runs job training workshops in sculpture and silk weaving that teach traditional arts and handicrafts to unemployed 18-to-25-year-old Cambodians with limited educations. The organization also provides job opportunities.

“The training program uses local stone and preserves traditional ­Khmer crafts. Students incorporate modern designs, colors, and quality controls into their work, giving the traditional craft a modern makeover, and producing top-flight results,” says Kernem.

Artisans Angkor is also involved in the renovation of Angkor Wat, demonstrating how Cambodia is using modern and innovative methods, and job training for the poor, to revitalize traditional ­Khmer arts and crafts. Perhaps with time Cambodia’s germinating cultural revival and self-awareness will enable its civilization to regain the heights it once knew.

Relevant articles

Recent Articles

繁體 日本語

文化書柬

沈靜的交流

文‧曾蘭淑 圖‧林旻萱

柬埔寨有什麼魅力?讓從事視覺與影像設計的許紘捷變賣家產,到柬埔寨一待8年?讓念文化研究的林之淯,翻轉她對藝術的想像?

不只是中世紀宏偉的古文明吳哥窟,博大精深;不只是建築雕刻的精緻工藝,引人入勝;而是柬埔寨人歷經大規模屠殺與歷史檔案被銷毀的浩劫,一步步在滿目瘡痍的廢墟中,希望重建自己文化、尋回歷史真相的生命力,讓人低迴忘返。

 


 

一頭長髮紮在腦後,手戴著一串從柬埔寨不同廟裡祈福來的絲線手環,攝影文化工作者許紘捷慢條斯里地說:「喜歡改變的我,卻在柬埔寨貧乏的環境中,感受到單純的質樸與快樂。」

2010年因緣際會協助出版社到柬埔寨拍攝吳哥窟,在工作之餘,他請嘟嘟車司機帶他到觀光客不會到的鄉間,所到之處,看到柬埔寨生活的真實樣貌,與觀光區相比,落差非常大。

柬埔寨貧而知足的生活衝擊著許紘捷,他因此做了一個很大的決定:「我反省我的生活看似豐富,其實都是用錢堆起來的。有3間房子堆放我收集的玩具公仔、DVD、漫畫,我也不用去遞名片,就可以接到許多生意。」從事10年視覺設計工作的他,決定實踐「斷捨離」,賣了房子與許久的收藏,「把自己清乾淨,到柬埔寨當志工。」

心有所寄,志有所託

許紘捷2010年到柬埔寨為台灣希望之芽協會的義診團當國際志工,同時協助攝影記錄。2011年開始長住金邊,並且以經營只有3間套房與2間通鋪的民宿,來換取生活基本收入。8年來,他跑遍柬埔寨,透過攝影進行田野調查,用鏡頭見證柬埔寨的轉變。

民宿有太太幫忙打理,許紘捷利用更多時間參與希望之芽協會與以利國際服務社會企業的志工服務。

2015年許紘捷開始進行「兒童藝術創作計劃」,為希望之芽協會的貧戶兒童上繪畫課。「吸引他們前來上課的原因,不是因為可以免費學畫畫,而是因為有一頓免費的午餐。」

許紘捷的教法有些特別,與2位助教約法三章,絕不特別誇讚某位學生,也不打分數。「因為你一誇某位同學,其他人就開始模仿,學生在沒有任何參考的標準下,就會畫出自己的風格,我覺得這是獨立思考的開始。」他強調。

透過他出的怪題目,例如:雲上的高腳屋、植物與同學、鳥的風箏,學生的創作力被啟蒙,想像力被激發。由於這些貧童家裡沒有電視,家旁沒有商店,不會受到廣告印象的影響,只把生活週遭畫進畫作裡,例如:回家路上的蛇、禮佛時寺廟裡的雕刻,3年的畫作課,學生無師自通地表現出虛實技法,透過繁複線條所展現的原創力,與受到傳統繪畫技法訓練的作品截然不同。幾堂課下來,學生從無所適從、害羞,變得樂於分享,更有自信。

柬式符號:記錄消失的柬埔寨

為了記錄柬埔寨的不同樣貌,許紘捷沿著公路,走過一個一個的城鎮,看到什麼就拍什麼;沿著湄公河流域、洞里薩湖週邊,記錄下高棉傳統祭祖的亡人節、雨季結束感謝天神的送水節;他又循著原本戰後荒廢的鐵路,拍攝重新修築到完工後的改變,也記錄了沿著鐵路而居的住民生活。

許紘捷因緣際會接觸到許多柬埔寨人,包括早期經歷過紅色高棉的倖存者,他說:「柬國的知識份子不是被趕盡殺絕,就是逃往國外,鄰居與至親好友慘死的絕望,整個社會受到的集體創傷,讓健健康康的人也不奢望可以活到明天。」

柬埔寨的苦難因此激發著許紘捷思考,或許可以做些什麼來回饋、貢獻給這個國家,或許透過所拍的照片,可以發揮一些作用。他認為,對柬埔寨人來說,再多的國際援助都沒有用,除非新一代的知識份子發揮力量。

他也接觸到沒有經歷紅色高棉暴政的新一代知識份子與文史工作者,這些人抱持著延續自己國家傳統文化的強烈使命感,試圖透過音樂、紀錄片影響社會,不要忘記過去。但在這個過程中,因為戰爭的摧殘,沒有足夠的文史資料與資源來認識自己的國家,更讓許紘捷相信,用影像記錄柬埔寨的重要。

尤其是柬埔寨社會正歷經快速的變遷,讓他觀察到這個國家為了吸引外資與建設,正面臨大量文化資產被消滅的危機,而代表城市脈絡的老房子與廟宇,面臨拆毀的命運,卻沒有人記錄下來。

他舉例,他曾走遍各城各鄉,常見許多見證城市歷史的手繪舊招牌、有小吳哥意象的屋簷與壁畫、木屋旁手製欄杆上雕刻著一排兔子的精緻裝飾藝術,可是當下次經過時就拆掉不見了。

20186月回到台灣,累積了上萬張的圖檔與資料,他決心建立一個具有索引功能,影像與地圖兼具的資料庫──「柬式符號」,他希望更多到柬埔寨旅行的攝影師,可以補充更多的內容。

「我只是起一個頭,成事不必在我,柬埔寨這麼大,我相信有一天,柬埔寨需要這些文化檔案時,我的資料庫就會派上用場。因為一個民族沒有文化,就找不回自己的尊嚴。」許紘捷為他的工作下了最好的註腳。

傳承高棉傳統文化

柬埔寨新一代的藝術工作者希望傳承高棉傳統文化的熱情,同樣也感染了曾在柬埔寨現代舞團實習的林之淯。

就讀台北藝術大學舞蹈所文化研究與評論組的林之淯,2014年為了撰寫她的碩士論文,自告奮勇到柬埔寨永恆現代表演舞團實習。在她為舞團整理文獻與隨團演出的過程中,十分驚訝2003年才創團的永恆現代舞團,不僅有深刻的文化底蘊,17位舞者所涵蓋柬埔寨宮廷舞、面具舞、民俗舞蹈等多面向的舞作,豐富多采。

林之淯觀察,柬國的當代舞者,除了將家庭、社會關係反映在作品中,也會從戰爭中倖存的藝術家汲取知識,舞出父母親那一輩不想再談論的紅色高棉歷史。「曾有一位與我年紀相仿的舞者,十分努力提攜後進,並且致力保存高棉的傳統舞蹈,希望這些傳統文化不會到下一代就式微了。這種傳承民族文化的熱情,與台灣年輕人只想到自己要什麼,很不一樣。」林之淯說。

受到感染的林之淯,勉勵自己能成為台灣與東南亞表演藝術交流的種子。2016年她拿到文化部「青年文化園丁隊」補助,帶著台灣編舞者顏可茵、舞者劉航煜和視覺藝術家李奎壁,到柬埔寨舉行工作坊和交流演出。 

跨國界的文化交流

不只是許紘捷與林之淯,台北藝術大學從2014起擔任亞洲藝術院校聯盟理事主席,積極推動與東南亞各國進行教學與展演的交流。

國立傳統藝術中心今(2018)年初曾邀請柬埔寨金色年代藝術協會演出皮影戲與二弦說唱,台灣的柬籍新住民,還帶著香茅魚湯米線來慰勞表演工作者,有如異鄉的家人一般。

台灣戲曲學院則邀請榮念曾導演編導、主持《驚夢.天宮》工作坊,嘗試將傳統表演藝術進行跨地區、跨文化的對話與合作,今年10月並在台灣、香港等地演出。其中《天宮》舞作邀請柬埔寨的舞者Nget Rady,他專攻柬埔寨傳統面具舞中的猴角,與專攻京劇美猴王的老師張宇喬,各自教授古典高棉舞與傳統京劇,讓學生體會兩種傳統文化的精髓與創新。

台灣戲曲學院從2016年開始邀請東南亞傳統表演藝術家,透過開設藝術工作坊與大師班的方式,與當代劇場作一個連結。教務長陳正熙說,師生透過文化交流的學習,接觸不同國家傳統的表演藝術,打破傳統與現代的隔閡,能夠在傳統技藝基礎上,尋求當代藝術發展的可能。

舞者Rady曾多次來台演出,他的舞蹈狂野靈動、舞態生風。此次教授台灣戲曲學院的學生跳猴舞,他希望透過探索身體的動能,還有發聲的練習,訓練學生有自信地站在舞台上。

他說:「雖然台灣與柬埔寨在政治制度、社會背景都不一樣,但透過藝術與音樂,是可以將每一個人的心都串連在一起。」

跨領域的交流,還有亞聯扶輪社與吳哥藝術學校合作「藝術創作計劃」。亞聯扶輪社首次贊助6,000元美金,由吳哥藝術學校美術老師幫台灣希望之芽在暹粒扶助的貧童上繪畫課,並聯袂於今年11月中旬在台灣舉行「聯合義賣」。

吳哥藝術學校是1992年由法國政府出資創立的非政府組織。秘書Vidana Kernem指出,吳哥藝術學校透過創設絲織與雕刻的職業訓練工作坊,協助當地低學歷18~25歲的失業青年,習得雕刻、紡織等傳統工藝的一技之長,並且提供工作機會,甚至讓他們可以回到自己家鄉工作。

「我們在訓練過程中,特別保留了高棉傳統的技藝,運用當地的石材,透過現代的設計與色彩,品質的管控,以時尚包裝傳統工藝,讓學員的成品,如精品般地精緻。」Vidana Kernem所說學員的作品,在暹粒與金邊的機場專賣店都可以買得到,也讓吳哥藝術學校有「社會企業的愛馬仕」之稱。

19世紀法國生物學家亨利.穆奧為尋找熱帶動物,無意地在原始森林中發現了宏偉驚人的吳哥窟。吳哥藝術學校也同時參與吳哥窟古蹟修建的工程,確實成功地展現了柬埔寨在新舊交融的時代中,以現代、創新的方式,扶貧自立,復興高棉的傳統工藝與藝術。或許透過文化的復甦、自覺的力量,假以時日,柬埔寨能重振其古文明的光榮。

カンボジア文化復興を目指して

台湾との静かな交流

文・曾蘭淑 写真・林旻萱 翻訳・山口 雪菜

ビジュアル・映像デザインを専門とする許紘捷は、台湾の資産を売り払い、8年にわたってカンボジアで暮らした。文化研究に従事する林之淯は、カンボジアで芸術のイメージをくつがえされたという。いったいカンボジアにはどのような魅力があるのだろう。

長い歴史を誇るアンコール・ワットの壮麗な建築群と精緻な彫刻だけではない。カンボジアでは、大虐殺と歴史資料の消失という災禍を経て、人々が己の文化を復興させ、歴史の真相を明らかにしようと、廃墟の中から一歩ずつ歩み始めている。そこに見られる生命力こそが多くの人を惹きつけるのである。


長い髪を後ろに束ね、手首にはカンボジアの数々の寺院で祈祷してもらった絹のブレスレットが目を引く。フォトアーティストの許紘捷はゆっくりと話す。「変化を好む私ですが、カンボジアの貧しい環境では、シンプルな素朴さと喜びを感じることができます」と。

2010年、ある出版社の依頼でカンボジアのアンコール・ワットの写真を撮りに行った。その合間にトゥクトゥクの運転手に頼み、観光客が行かない田舎に連れて行ってもらった。そこで目にしたカンボジアの真の暮しは、観光地のそれとは大きくかけ離れたものだった。

貧しいながらも足るを知る暮らしに許紘捷は大きな衝撃を受け、一大決心をする。「台湾での暮らしを振り返ると、一見豊かなようですが、すべて金銭で得たものばかりでした」そこで徹底的に断捨離を実践し、台湾の家とコレクションを売り払うことにした。そして、さっぱりしてカンボジアにボランティアに来たのである。

失われたカンボジアを記録する

許紘捷は2010年、カンボジアで台湾希望之芽協会が行なう無料診療チームのボランティアとなり、それと同時に写真による記録を始めた。2011年からはプノンペンに定住し、個室3部屋、相部屋2部屋の民宿をオープンして生活のための収入を確保した。8年来、彼はカンボジア各地をめぐり、フィールドワークを行ないつつ、この国の変化をカメラに収めてきた。

カンボジアのさまざまな表情をとらえようと、許紘捷は道路沿いに町や村を一つひとつ訪ね歩き、目に入ったものを写真に撮り続けた。メコン川流域やトンレサップ湖の周辺ではクメール伝統の祖先を祭る行事や雨季の終わりに天に感謝する水祭りなどを目にした。時には戦争で荒廃した鉄道沿いに行き、修復された鉄道や沿線住民の暮しを写真に撮った。

許紘捷が出会った人の中には、かつてクメール・ルージュの弾圧を生き延びた人もいた。「カンボジアの知識人は皆殺しにされ、海外へ逃亡した人もいました。隣人や友人が惨殺されるという絶望の中、社会全体が心に深い傷を負い、健康な人も明日の希望さえ持てませんでした」

こうした苦難は許紘捷に多くを考えさせ、自分に何かできることはないかと思うようになった。カンボジアの人々にとっては、若い世代の知識人が育つことの方が、国際援助より大切なのではないかと許紘捷は感じている。

そうした中で、クメール・ルージュの暴政を経験したことのない若い知識人や文化人とも出会った。彼らは自分たちの国の伝統文化の伝承に強い使命感を抱いており、音楽やドキュメンタリーフィルムなどを通して社会に影響を及ぼし、過去を忘れないよう呼びかけている。だが、戦争によって貴重な史料やリソースが失われており、自分たちの文化を知る手がかりは限られている。そこで許紘捷は、映像でカンボジアを記録することの重要性を再認識した。

ましてやカンボジア社会は今まさに急速な変化を遂げており、外資誘致と建設のために大量の文化遺産が消失しようとしている。都市の歴史を物語る古い家屋や寺院も取り壊されようとしており、それを記録する人がいない。

2018年6月に帰国した許紘捷は、撮りためた一万枚に上る写真や資料を整理し、画像と地図を合わせて検索できるデータバンク「柬式符号」を立ち上げた。カンボジアを訪れる他の写真家の作品も募り、内容を豊富にしたいと考えている。

「一つのきっかけになればと思っただけです。将来いつか、カンボジアでこれらの文化ファイルが必要となった時、データバンクが役に立つでしょう。民族の文化が失われてしまったら、己の尊厳も取り戻せませんから」と言う。

クメール伝統文化の伝承

カンボジアの若い芸術家たちもクメール伝統文化の伝承に情熱を注いでおり、それがカンボジアで現代舞踊を実習する林之زRの心を動かした。

台北芸術大学の舞踊科大学院で文化研究・評論を学ぶ林之淯は、2014年に修士論文を書くためにカンボジアに渡り、同国の舞踊団「アムリタ・パフォーミング・アーツ」で実習した。実習中に舞踊団の文書を整理し、公演に同行する中で彼女は大いに驚いた。2003年に創設されたばかりの舞踊団ながら、彼らは文化的に深い基礎を持ち、17人のダンサーは宮廷舞踊から仮面舞踊、民間舞踊まで、さまざまなダンスが踊れるのである。

林之淯によると、カンボジアのダンサーは、家庭や社会を反映した作品だけでなく、戦争で生き残ったアーティストにも教えを請い、親の世代が語ろうとしないクメール・ルージュの歴史も表現している。「私と同年代のダンサーが、懸命に後進を育成していて、しかもクメールの伝統舞踊が次の世代で消えてしまわないよう、何とか保存しようと努力しているのです。民族文化継承に対する熱い想いは、自分のやりたいことしか考えない台湾の若者とは大きく異なります」と言う。こうして林之淯は、台湾とカンボジアのパフォーマンスアート交流の懸け橋になりたいと考えるようになった。

国境を越えた文化交流

許紘捷と林之淯だけではない。台湾戯曲学院では、『驚夢・天宮』ワークショップの主宰に栄念曾監督を招き、地域や文化を越えた伝統のパフォーマンスアートの対話と交流を試み、2018年10月には台湾と香港で公演を行なった。その作品『天宮』ではカンボジアの舞踊家Nget Radyを招いた。彼は猿の仮面舞踊を専門とし、京劇で孫悟空を演じる張宇喬とともに、それぞれクメール舞踊と京劇を教え、学生たちは二つの異なる伝統文化の精髄を学ぶことができた。

舞踊家のRadyは幾度も台湾公演を行なっており、そのダンスは力強さと野性味にあふれている。彼は何回か台湾戯曲学院の学生たちに猿の舞を教えているが、学生にはそれを通して肉体のエネルギーを感じ取り、発声練習を通して舞台に立つ自信を持たせたいと考えている。

「台湾とカンボジアは政治制度も社会の背景も異なりますが、芸術と音楽を通せばすべての人の心は一つにつながります」とRadyは言う。

分野を越えた交流は他にもある。ロータリークラブ台北アジア・リンクと、カンボジアの芸術・工芸学校アーティザン・アンコールとの間の「アート・クリエイション・プログラム」だ。ロータリーのアジア・リンクが6000米ドルを提供し、アーティザン・アンコールの美術教師が、台湾希望之芽協会がシェムリアップで行なっている貧しい子供たちの絵画教室を支援し、2018年11月中旬に台湾でチャリティ販売会を開くというものだ。

アーティザン・アンコールは1992年にフランス政府が出資して設立されたNGOである。秘書のVidana Kernem氏によると、同学校はシルクの織物と彫刻を教える職業訓練ワークショップを通して、現地の低学歴の18〜25歳の失業者に伝統工芸の技術を身につけさせ、さらに雇用機会も提供している。技術を取得した生徒は故郷に帰って働くこともできる。

「ここの訓練では、特別にクメールの伝統工芸も取り入れています。地元の石材を用い、現代のデザインと色彩を応用し、品質を厳しく管理して美しいパッケージに収めれば、高級品のような仕上がりになります」とKernem氏は言う。ここの生徒の作品は、シェムリアップとプノンペンの空港でも販売されている。

アーティザン・アンコールは、アンコール・ワットの遺跡修復にも加わっている。新旧が入れ替わりつつあるカンボジアで、現代的かつ革新的な方法で貧しい人々の自立を助け、クメール文化の工芸と芸術の復興を支えている。文化復興と人々の自覚によって、いつの日か、カンボジアは文明の栄光を取り戻すことだろう。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!