Saving Taiwan’s Crow Butterflies

:::

2016 / January

Kuo Han-chen /photos courtesy of Hsu Ching-ho /tr. by David Mayer


“Thousands of crow butterflies

Flap their resilient wings

In a three-day aerial parade

Undulating forward across hill and dale.”

—Tseng Kuei-hai, “Wintertime Festival of the Crow Butterflies”


The above lines are a description of the habitat of Taiwan’s crow butterflies, penned by the noted poet ­Tseng Kuei-hai in celebration of the annual migration of the butterflies, which move in prodigious numbers each year from north to south, and then back again a few months later. However, the heavy hand of climate change has been swatting away at the crow butterflies in recent years.

Purple river

Maolin District is located 58 kilometers to the northeast of downtown Kao­hsiung in a largely undeveloped area of virgin forest traversed by the Zhuo­kou River and punctuated by high peaks, waterfalls, and valleys. Most of the residents in this district are from the indigenous Ru­kai tribe, well known for its distinctive stone slab houses. The butterfly valleys here, regarded as world-class eco-landscapes, are where Taiwan’s crow butterflies head to spend the winter.

“Perhaps because crow butterflies have always been such a common sight,” says Ru­kai tribe member Chen Yizhen, “we Ru­kai folk have always felt a bit ho-hum about them. It wasn’t till their numbers suddenly dropped in the past few years that we finally realized how precious they are.”

Crow butterflies belong to the genus Eu­ploea in the subfamily Da­na­inae, the milkweed butterflies. Ranging from medium to large in size, they have a wingspan of four to eight centimeters. They breed from spring through summer throughout Taiwan, but congregate in winter in the warm climate of southern Taiwan. Mao­lin District in Kao­hsiung is one of their main wintering grounds.

Noted lepidopterist Chan Chia-lung explains that there are four species of crow butterfly in Taiwan: the striped blue crow (Euploea mulciber); the blue-banded king crow (E. eunice); the double-branded crow (E. sylvester); and the dwarf crow (E. tulliolus). Like all moths and butterflies, their wings are covered with minute scales, such that sunlight reflecting off the scales will produce a sheen in various shades of purple, depending on the angle of the light. Japanese entomologists have coined a special noun—magic light—to describe the color thrown off by crow butterfly wings.

Scholars have identified at least three stages of the annual crow butterfly migration cycle. The first stage occurs in March and early April, when the butterflies move north. Then in May through early June, a new generation of young butterflies just emerged from pupae undertake a secondary migration. And in early to mid-October, crow butterflies begin migrating en masse to the south, covering hundreds of kilometers on their trip in an airborne spectacle that has been dubbed “the butterfly highway.”

Butterfly watching activities in Mao­lin run from November (after the butterflies have arrived for the winter) through the following March. At the height of the migration, as many as 10,000 crow butterflies per minute can be observed flying along at very high speed, creating a virtual river of purple light. It is a truly stunning sight.

Sharp drop in numbers

“When I was a kid,” says Mao­lin old-timer Chen ­Sheng, “I often saw huge swarms of crow butterflies that practically filled the sky. It was breathtaking.” He also recalls riding his bicycle to school and falling after slipping on butterflies.

As early as the 1960s, scientists conducted field surveys in Mao­lin and found that at times the butterflies in the valleys there could number up to 2 or 3 million. Mao­lin ranks, along with the valleys in Mexico where many monarch butterflies winter, as one of the two largest butterfly wintering sites in the world. However, the number of butterflies wintering each year in Mao­lin has dropped off sharply due to the destruction of habitats and the impact of extreme weather.

Chan Chia-lung notes that the number of crow butterflies in southern Taiwan now peaks at about 600,000. In the valleys of Mao­lin, this number is down to about 100,000 to 200,000; in an earlier time, by contrast, up to a million could be observed there. These figures show that if we don’t show a greater sense of urgency in our conservation efforts, this lepidopteran miracle of Taiwan’s might one day be no more.

The biggest single cause of the butterflies’ disappearance is habitat destruction. Whereas their migration route used to steer them well clear of human activity, much new land has now been cleared for agriculture, and the butterflies have to get across more roads and freeways than ever before. In 2007, Chan discovered that many of the butterflies returning north in the spring were being killed or injured after getting caught up in the powerful vortices created by cars traveling at high speed along Taiwan’s freeways.

Making way for the butterflies

Chan got together with Cheng Juey-fu and Lin Tie-­shyong (associate professors in the Department of Civil and Ecological Engineering at I-Shou University) and contacted the National Freeway Bureau to suggest that protective netting be put up along selected stretches of freeway to help the butterflies get safely over the hurdles. Their suggestion was accepted.

During the northward migration (early March through Tomb Sweeping Day on April 5), the highway authorities work together with environmental groups to put up protective netting, when the butterfly traffic merits it, along National Freeway No. 3 at the 252 kilometer marker, and when the butterflies are especially numerous they further close a 500-meter stretch of the outside lane to make sure the butterflies get across.

Taiwan’s efforts to protect the crow butterflies have attracted international attention, and even featured in programs on National Geographic Channel and Discovery Channel. Every time Chan has gone overseas in recent years to take part in environmental activities, foreigners never fail to tell him of their high regard for what Taiwan has been doing for ecological preservation.

Inspired by Chan, a group of indigenous residents in Mao­lin formed the Kao­hsiung City Mao­lin District Crow Butterfly Preservation Association.

In addition to habitat destruction, another thing the association is especially worried about is climate extremes, which have become much worse in the past year or two.

Tang Xiong­jin, of the preservation association, explains that Taiwan’s climate has become quite hot, causing some plants to flower at odd times, sometimes leaving butterflies, which depend on nectar as their main food source, without their normal fare available. In addition, water sources have dried up considerably this year. Butterflies don’t usually go foraging for water until January, but they’ve recently been appearing at the mouth of the Zhuo­kou River on precisely that errand. The association is monitoring the situation closely to see whether it will cause a big drop in butterfly populations.

To preserve crow butterfly populations, reports Tang, the association last year leased a mountain valley from the forest authorities and built a footpath and ecopark for visitors interested in butterfly watching. The idea is to get more people interested in and committed to the protection of butterflies. In addition to the leased valley, Mao­lin District has seven or eight other mountain valleys where authorities carefully limit the number of vehicles allowed to enter.

Eco-friendly farming

Apart from active efforts by environmental groups to protect the butterflies, various social groups and farmers are also getting into eco-friendly farming as a means of improving butterfly habitats, and support for these efforts is beginning to grow. Crow butterflies need nectar plants. Mango flowers, for example, are an important food source for them as they migrate northward in the spring, but farmers have long used chemicals to keep pests away from their mango trees, and this practice has been detrimental to the survival of crow butterflies.

Su Muh-rong, chief executive officer of the Tse-Xin Organic Agriculture Foundation (TOAF), explains that his organization has been promoting butterfly-friendly farming techniques in the hills of Mao­lin since 2012. In the first year they encouraged farmers to cut down on the use of agricultural chemicals at least to the point where fruits dropping from trees would be free of residues. At the beginning six farmers responded to the call, and this year the number of participants is up to 13. Among them, five farmers have abandoned agrochemicals completely and received certificates from the Forestry Bureau in recognition of their contribution to environmental conservation.

TOAF has helped farmers enter into supplier contracts with Lee­zen Company, which runs a chain of organic food shops throughout Taiwan and has used the mangoes supplied by these farmers to develop a variety of organic products, including unripe mangoes, dried native mango, and “lovers’ fruit” popsicles (i.e. popsicles laden with bits and pieces of unripe native mango). This approach makes for a happy modus vivendi between humans and butterflies. Su says that TOAF encourages farmers to cultivate nectar plants all around their mango trees as a food source for adult crow butterflies.

The push for butterfly-friendly farming met with strong resistance at first. Chen Yi­zhen, deputy chair of the Mao­lin District Council, acknowledges that reducing or abandoning the use of agrochemicals will cause production to drop, but feels it’s worth it in order to protect the crow butterflies, which is why she is vigorously promoting it. She expects that 21 farmers will be practicing the new techniques next year.

Butterfly defense brigade

Crow butterflies live in Taiwan’s flatlands up to an altitude of 500 meters. Pretty much anywhere that humans can live, so can the crow butterflies, so they serve as a pretty good benchmark for environmental quality. Chan points out that Taiwan originally had five species of crow butterfly, but only four remain now; the Taiwan large crow (Euploea phaenareta juvia) is the first species of butterfly ever to disappear from Taiwan.

Chan stresses that visitors to Mao­lin must not shake trees or throw stones while the crow butterflies are wintering there, so as not to disturb their rhythms. In addition to supporting butterfly-friendly farming, members of the public can also help by cultivating more nectar plants at home.

Preparing to leave Mao­lin, we take a last look at a cloud of crow butterflies as they flutter about the plants and shrubbery before disappearing into the forest. The undulating sheen of purple in motion is a sight we won’t soon forget.

繁體中文 日文

大自然最幻美的 紫光舞者─ 搶救紫斑蝶大行動

文‧郭漢辰 圖‧許清河

千千萬萬隻斑蝶

拍擊強韌的翅翼

連綿成三天三夜的空中蝶道

凝視成一寸又一寸島國的山戀和波濤……

──曾貴海〈紫斑蝶的越冬慶典〉


這是知名詩人曾貴海勾勒紫斑蝶生態的詩作,不但書寫天際流動驚人的紫色光河奇景,更描述紫斑蝶遷移活動,從北到南,從西向東,最末飛越中央山脈,飛繞整個台灣,成為島國之內最盛大的生態慶典。

這應該是從空中所能窺見島國最美麗的景致了。只不過,在這個多變年代,氣候異常的巨掌,已悄然伸向紫斑蝶。

2015年12月初,雖然時序已經進入冬天,但南台灣茂林山區異常炎熱,艷陽當空,沒人感受到冬季的寒冷。我們與一群遊客一同走入賞蝶

園區,看到翩翩飛舞的紫斑蝶,紛紛讚嘆這大自然的美景。

興奮遊客無法了解的是,這群紫色嬌客正面臨命運轉變的關鍵時刻。而一批又一批的有心人,近十年投入保育蝶群的活動。

一場搶救紫斑蝶的大行動,正與時間用力拔河中。

山林裡的紫色微光

茂林區位於高雄市中心東北方58公里處,周邊多為未開發的原始山林,濁口溪穿流全區,形成高山峻嶺、瀑布、峽谷等豐富地景。全區大多為魯凱族人,著名的文化資產為石板屋,而被視為世界級生態景觀的紫斑蝶幽谷,每年冬季至隔年春天,蝶群都會大量飛來茂林過冬。

「我們魯凱族人稱紫斑蝶為Svongvong,蝶群很早就陪伴在族人身邊,或許太常看到而習以為常。直到這幾年,發現牠們數量減少,我們才知道牠們如此珍貴……」陳亦蓁說道。她正是茂林第一批投入友善環境栽種芒果的魯凱族人。

紫斑蝶隸屬斑蝶亞科;紫斑蝶屬,展翅可達4~8公分,為中大型蝶種。牠們從春天到夏季,在各地繁殖,冬天會集體飛到溫暖的南台灣過冬,高雄茂林區就是蝶群主要棲息地之一。高雄市茂林區紫斑蝶生態保育促進會總幹事湯雄勁說,另一處更大規模的蝶群過冬處在屏東縣春日鄉山林深處,比較無法入山貼近觀察。

知名蝴蝶學者詹家龍表示,台灣有4種紫斑蝶,分別為端紫斑蝶、圓翅紫斑蝶、斯氏紫斑蝶與小紫斑蝶。牠們有著神奇結構鱗片的雙翼,在陽光照射下,隨著各種映射光線的角度,呈現不同深淺的紫色,彷如一陣流動穿流的紫光,十分奇幻瑰麗,日本昆蟲學家稱此種如同幻境裡的光芒為「幻光」。

目前學界歸納出紫斑蝶全年遷移模式,每年至少有3次大規模遷移。最早發生每年三、四月清明節前後,即所謂的「初春北返」。五月中至六月初,新羽化的第一代紫斑蝶展開「二次遷移」。每年十月國慶日前後,蝶群開始最重要的「南遷度冬」。這樣綿延台灣南北一百多公里的大遷移,被稱為天空中的壯觀「蝶道」。

茂林的賞蝶活動,從蝶群南遷過冬之後的十一月至隔年的三月。在蝶群遷移的高峰時期,每分鐘約有一萬隻紫斑蝶,以極為飛快的速度飛掠,如同紫光之河,穿流過觀看者的眼前,成為難得一見的生態奇觀。

蝶群數量銳減

「我小時候,經常看到遮蔽天空的大群紫斑蝶,那時看得我目瞪口呆……」茂林當地耆老陳勝回憶當年紫斑蝶的盛況。他還記得小時候在農地上學騎腳踏車,一不小心就壓到蝴蝶而滑倒。

早在60年代就有學者深入茂林調查,那時茂林山谷裡的蝶群,數量最多可高達兩、三百萬隻,牠們滿天飛舞,場面壯觀,與墨西哥的帝王谷,同被列為全世界最大規模的蝶谷。只是隨著蝶群的棲息地嚴重遭受人為破壞,再加上極端異常氣候影響,茂林的紫斑蝶數量已然大量減少。

詹家龍說,近年南台灣紫斑蝶數量最多時,已降為60萬隻左右,茂林蝶谷更是僅剩10萬至20萬隻,與當年單單茂林一處就有上百萬隻蝶群的盛況,根本無法相比。這些訊息在在證明,如果人們保育腳步不再積極一點,此一被譽為台灣生態奇蹟的蝶谷,可能會逐漸消失。

棲息地的環境遭受人為破壞,成為蝶群消失的主要殺手之一,以往遠離人類生活環境的遷移路線,如今已被開發為農地,緊鄰大馬路或高速公路旁,受到人類文明的威脅。2007年著名的紫斑蝶專家詹家龍研究發現,紫斑蝶在春季北返時竟然要穿越國道,而眾多車輛高速行駛所捲起的龐大氣流,造成蝶群大量傷亡,部份路段僅剩五萬多隻數量。

國道封閉 禮讓蝶道

詹家龍和義守大學土木與生態工程學系的學者鄭瑞富、林鐵雄,主動接洽國道高速公路局。公路單位接受了學者們的建議,架設起防護網,讓蝶群優先飛過國道。這是國內第一起禮讓天上嬌客的生態保護行動,也掀起了近十年的搶救紫斑蝶運動。

詹家龍說,搶救公路上的蝶群行動從2007年開始,迄今已近十年,未來還將持續推動下去。搶救行動在三月初至清明節之間進行,這段時間正是紫斑蝶北返時刻,公路單位配合生態團體,在國道3號的252公里處,視每分鐘的蝶流量多寡,在國道旁架起防護網,蝶群數量眾多時,便封閉外側道路五百公尺左右,讓蝶群先行飛過。

台灣保護紫斑蝶行動引起各國高度注目,還上了國際生態頻道。這幾年詹家龍每到國外參加生態活動,外國朋友對於此一具有高度生態保育意義的行動,都豎起大姆指,認為台灣真棒,為了保護紫斑蝶,政府竟然可以封閉國道,這是許多國家做不到的事。

深入地方的保育行動

受到詹家龍的啟發,一群茂林在地的原住民成立高雄市茂林區紫斑蝶生態保育促進會。協會總幹事湯雄勁雖然是來自阿里山的鄒族,他娶當地人為妻,早已是道道地地的茂林人,並且積極投入搶救紫斑蝶活動。

根據湯雄勁觀察茂林紫斑蝶幽谷的生態,2009年的八八風災是個極大的分水嶺。他說,八八風災之前,茂林區的賞蝶步道及生態園區(原住民名稱「島給納山」),因為大興土木施建工程,反而將前來的紫斑蝶嚇跑,那年的蝶群量跌至歷年最低。

「八八風災後,各地聚落受損嚴重,茂林地區的獨特封閉性,反而保護了蝶群的棲息地,當年就出現紫斑蝶大爆發現象,數量直線飆升。」湯雄勁說。不過,除了棲息地受到人為和天然因素破壞之外,最讓促進會擔心的是,這一兩年日益加劇的氣候異常情況。

湯雄勁說,台灣氣候變得相當炎熱,原本要晚些開花的草本類與喬木類,因異常氣候,不是提前開花,就是早已結束花期,使得以蜜源植物為主食的紫斑蝶,不知要吃些什麼。此外,今年水源嚴重枯歇,原本要到一月蝶群才會開始出現覓水行為,但是他們最近已在附近的濁口溪發現大量蝶群,開始尋找水源。蝶群會不會因此大幅減少,促進會正密切觀察中。

為了推動紫斑蝶保育工作,湯雄勁說,促進會去年已向林務單位租下島給納山區,做為賞蝶步道及生態園區,讓遊客親眼見到紫斑蝶,進而愛護牠,投入蝶群的保護行列。除了此區之外,茂林區還有其他七八處山谷,嚴格管制人車進出,讓蝶群的棲息地受到完整保護。

友善農耕搶救蝶群

除了生態團體的積極參與之外,部份民間團體與農民們,以友善農耕方式,改善蝶群生長環境,開始慢慢獲得良好迴響。紫斑蝶需要蜜源植物,其中「芒果花」為蝶群準備返回北部時,極為重要的食物來源,但之前農民大都使用農藥以減少芒果樹的病蟲害,連帶危及了紫斑蝶的生存。

慈心基金會執行蘇慕容指出,為了推動有機農業,更保護紫斑蝶珍貴的大自然生態,他們從2012年起在茂林山區推動友善農耕,第一年鼓勵農友以減少施用農藥的方式,做到落果時無農藥殘留,從一開始6位農友參與,到今年已有13位農友加入減低使用農藥的行列,其中5位農友全程不使用農藥,獲得林務局頒發的「綠色保育標章」。

慈心基金會協助農友們,與有機農業里仁公司達成契作合作關係,將所收購的青芒果開發成「紫斑蝶芒果青」、「土芒果青鮮果乾」及「情人果冰棒」多款商品,從此,人與蝶可以共生共榮。蘇慕容說,他們鼓勵農友們在芒果樹周邊,種植蜜源植物,讓紫斑蝶食用。

剛開始推動友善農耕時,受到很大的阻力,茂林區代表會副主席陳亦蓁說,她是第一個加入的人,雖然減少或完全不使用農藥使產量減少,但是為了保護紫斑蝶,她全力配合,預計到明年會有21人願意加入這個行列。

友善農耕已獲得部落大多數農民的支持,耆老陳勝是其中之一,由於他的投入及支持,不少農民紛紛效尤。農友盧秋星從一開始減少農藥使用,進而計畫全程無農藥的栽種,申請綠色保育標章。

成為保護紫斑蝶尖兵

紫斑蝶生長在台灣平原到海拔500公尺處,只要是人類可以生存的環境,紫斑蝶便可以展翅飛翔,堪稱是台灣環境的生態指標。詹家龍指出,台灣原本擁有5種紫斑蝶,目前只剩下4種,消失的大紫斑蝶,是台灣第一個絕種的蝴蝶。

詹家龍強調,「我們每個人都可以保護紫斑蝶,尤其在紫斑蝶來此過冬的季節,千萬不要干擾牠,不能搖樹、丟石頭,以避免驚擾蝶群的作息。民眾更應支持友善農耕行動,在居家多種些蜜源植物,增加蝶群數量,人人都可成為保育紫斑蝶的尖兵。」

離開茂林之際,我們窺見一群又一群的紫斑蝶,在花叢中自由自在地飛舞,最後隱沒山林裡,留下一抹紫色幻光,在我們的雙眼及記憶裡永恆飛旋。

ルリマダラ保護アクション

文・郭漢辰 写真・許清河

幾千万のルリマダラ

力強い羽を羽ばたかせ

三日三晩続く蝶の道となり

島国の山や谷を描き出す

—曾貴海「ルリマダラ越冬の祭典」


詩人・曾貴海がルリマダラの生態に寄せた詩である。目を奪われる紫の光の河の光景を書き記し、ルリマダラの大移動をも描き出す。北から南へ、西から東へ、最後には中央山脈をも飛び越える。台湾全土を飛び、島国最大の生命の祭典を見せてくれる。

台湾の空に浮かぶ最も美しい景色だが、温暖化の巨大な手がルリマダラに迫る。

2015年12月初旬、暦は冬でも南台湾の茂林山地は異常な暑さの中、太陽が照りつけ、冬の到来など微塵も感じられない。観光客とともに蝶の鑑賞エリアに入った。舞い踊るルリマダラを見て口々に大自然の美を讃えている。

観光客の興奮をよそに、紫色の可憐な存在は運命の転換期に直面している。そして関心を持つ人々がこの十年、次々と蝶類の保護活動に加わっている。ルリマダラを守る壮大なアクションは今、時間との綱引きの真最中なのである。

紫色の微かな光

茂林は高雄市中心部から北東へ58キロの所にある。周囲は多くが未開発の原生林で、濁口渓が全エリアを流れ、変化に富んだ地形をなす。ほぼ全域にルカイの人々が住み、その伝統の石板屋はワールド・モニュメント財団の文化遺産に指定されている。同エリアは世界有数の生態現象である「紫斑蝶幽谷(ルリマダラの谷)」と呼ばれ、毎年冬から翌年の春まで、蝶の大群が茂林に飛来して越冬する。

「ルカイ族はルリマダラをSvongvongと呼びます。昔から蝶は私たちのそばにいて、それが当り前でしたが、減少に気づいて初めて貴重な存在だと知りました」と話す陳亦蓁は、茂林で最初に環境にやさしいマンゴー栽培に取り組んだルカイ族である。

ルリマダラはマダラチョウ亜科ルリマダラ属で、羽を広げると4~8cmになる中・大型の蝶である。春から夏にかけて各地で繁殖し、冬は集団で暖かい南台湾に飛んで冬を越す。茂林は蝶の主要な棲息地である。高雄市茂林区ルリマダラ生態保育促進会総幹事・湯雄勁は、もっと規模の大きい越冬地が屏東県春日郷の山奥にあるが、近距離での観察は難しいという。

蝶の研究で知られる学者の詹家龍によると、台湾にはルリマダラ4種が生息する。ツマムラサキマダラ、マルバネルリマダラ、ルリマダラ、ホリシャルリマダラである。鱗構造の翅は、陽が当たる角度で異なる紫色に見える。まるで流れる紫色の光線のように不思議な美しさである。日本の昆虫学者はそのファンタジックな輝きを「幻光」と言った。

学術界ではルリマダラには年3回以上の大移動があるとされる。最初は3~4月、清明節前後の春の北帰行である。5月中旬から6月上旬には新たに羽化したルリマダラが二次移動する。10月の国慶節前後は、ルリマダラにとって最も重要な越冬のための南遷である。台湾南北百キロ以上にわたる壮観な大移動は天空の「蝶の道」といわれる。

茂林の蝶観賞は、蝶が越冬のために南へ飛んだ後の11月から翌3月まで行われる。移動のピークの時期には、毎分1万頭のルリマダラが非常な速さで飛んでいく。紫色の光の河が目の前を通り過ぎる様は、自然界の奇観といっていい。

蝶が激減

「子供のころ、天を覆うルリマダラの大群を呆然と眺めたものです」茂林の古老・陳勝はルリマダラの盛況を思い出す。農地で自転車の練習をして、蝶を踏んでしまい滑って転んだという。

60年代にはすでに専門家が茂林に入って調査を行っている。茂林の山の蝶の集団は、当時最高で200万頭以上いた。空いっぱいに飛ぶ様子は壮観で、メキシコのオオカバマダラ(モナルカ蝶)と並ぶ世界最大級の蝶の谷とされている。しかし、棲息地が人間に破壊され、気候変動の影響も加わって、茂林のルリマダラは激減した。

詹家龍によると、近年では南台湾のルリマダラは多くても60万頭に減り、茂林の蝶の谷には10万~20万頭しかいないという。茂林だけで百万の蝶がいた盛況とは比べようもない。このことは、人間がより真剣に向き合わない限り、台湾の生態の奇跡たる蝶の谷が失われることを意味する。

棲息地環境の人為的な破壊は、蝶が消えた元凶である。人間の生活から遠く離れた移動経路が今では農地になり、道路や高速道路に隣接し、文明の脅威にさらされている。詹家龍の2007年の研究で、ルリマダラが春に北へ帰るとき高速道路を跨ぐことがわかった。高速走行する車両が巻き起こす巨大な気流によって、蝶の集団が大量死し、一部地域では5万頭あまりしか残っていなかった。

高速道路封鎖 蝶に道を譲る

詹家龍と義守大学土木・生態工学科の鄭瑞富と林鉄雄は、国道高速公路局にかけあった。当局は提言を入れ、防護網を設置し、蝶の集団が高速道路を飛び越せるようにした。国内初、空の生き物に道を譲る生態保護アクションとなり、その後10年に及ぶルリマダラ保護運動を引き起こした。

詹家龍は、道路上の蝶集団を守るアクションを2007年から開始し、間もなく10年を迎える。アクションは3月初旬から清明節の間に実施される。これはルリマダラが北へ帰る時期に当たる。当局は生態保護団体に協力し、高速道路3号線の252キロ地点で毎分の蝶流量の多寡に応じて高速道路脇に防護網を設置している。蝶が多い時には外側車線約500メートルを封鎖して、蝶の集団を通過させる。

台湾のルリマダラ保護アクションは各国から注目を浴び、国際的な生態番組にも登場した。この数年は詹家龍が海外の自然保護イベントに参加するたびに、ルリマダラ保護の意義あるアクションに対する賛同の声を聞く。ルリマダラ保護のために行政が高速道路を封鎖する台湾は素晴らしく、多くの国が真似できないことだという。

地域の保護アクションに関わって

詹家龍に啓発されて、地元の原住民が高雄市茂林区ルリマダラ生態保育促進会を設立した。総幹事の湯雄勁は阿里山出身のツォウ族だが、茂林の地元の人を妻とし、すっかり茂林の人となってルリマダラ保護に取り組む。

湯雄勁がルリマダラの谷の生態を観察したところ、2009年の八八水害が分水嶺となっている。水害前、茂林区の蝶観賞歩道と生態公園ゾーン(原住民族名は「島給納山」)は大掛かりな土木工事でルリマダラが寄り付かず、その年の蝶の数は最低だった。「八八水害で各地の集落が深刻な被害を蒙ると、茂林の閉鎖性が蝶の棲息地を守る形になり、その年はルリマダラが爆発的に増えました」と湯雄勁はいう。しかし、棲息地の破壊や自然災害による破壊のほかに、促進会が憂慮するのが日に日に進む温暖化である。

台湾の気候は暑さを増し、もっと遅く花が咲くべき草本植物と喬木類の開花が早まったり、開花期が過ぎたりして、蜜のある植物を餌とするルリマダラの食べ物がなくなった。また今年は深刻な水不足で、1月にならないと吸水行動が見られないはずが、12月上旬から濁口渓に蝶が集まっていた。蝶の集団がそれによって大幅減少しないかと促進会では特に注意して観察している。

ルリマダラ保護のために、促進会は昨年林務当局から島給納山を借受け、蝶観賞歩道と生態公園にして、観光客がルリマダラを自分の目で見て、愛着を感じ、蝶の保護に参加してくれるよう働きかけている。同エリアのほかにも、茂林区には7~8箇所の谷があり、人と車両の進入を厳しく制限し、蝶の棲息地を手厚く保護している。

環境にやさしい農業が蝶を救う

生態保護団体の参加だけでなく、一部の民間団体と農家も、環境保全型農業で蝶の生育環境改善を図り、少しずつよい反響が聞かれ出した。ルリマダラには蜜のある植物が必要で、特にマンゴーの花は北へ帰る準備をする上で極めて重要であるが、マンゴーの木の病虫害を防いでいた農薬は、ルリマダラの生存をも脅かしていた。

慈心基金会の蘇慕容によると、有機農業推進とルリマダラ保護を目的に、基金会は2012年から茂林山地で環境保全型農業を推進している。初年度は農薬削減を奨励し、果実収穫時の農薬残留をゼロにした。最初は農家6人だったが、今年は13人が農薬削減に加わった。内5人は完全無農薬で林務局の「緑色保育標章」を獲得した。

慈心基金会は農家を支援し、有機農業里仁公司と協力契約締結にこぎつけた。生産販売された青マンゴーは「ルリマダラ青マンゴー」「ドライ原産種マンゴー」「青マンゴーアイス」といった商品となり、以来、人と蝶は共存共栄できるようになった。蘇慕容は、農家がマンゴーの木の周辺にルリマダラの餌である蜜の源になる植物を植えるように勧めている。

環境保全型農業の推進当初は大きな抵抗に遭ったという。茂林区代表会副主席・陳亦蓁は最初の参加者である。農薬削減や不使用で生産は減るものの、それでもルリマダラ保護に全力で協力する。来年は21人が新たに加わるとみられ、今では村落の農家の大多数に支持されている。古老・陳勝もその一人である。陳の参加と支持で多くの農家がこれに続いた。盧秋星は農薬削減から始め、完全無農薬栽培を計画し、緑色保育標章を申請した。

ルリマダラ保護の先鋒に

ルリマダラは平野から海抜500メートルの間に棲息し、人が生きられる環境ならルリマダラは羽を広げて飛べる。台湾における環境の生態指標といえる。詹家龍は、かつて台湾にはルリマダラが5種いたが今は4種しかいないという。消えたオオムラサキマダラは、台湾で絶滅した最初の蝶である。

詹家龍は語気を強める。「一人ひとりがルリマダラを守ることができます。特にルリマダラが飛来して越冬する季節には、絶対邪魔をしないこと。木をゆすったり石を投げたりして蝶を驚かさないように。そして環境保全型農業を支持し、蜜の元になる植物を植え、蝶を増やします。誰もがルリマダラ保護の先鋒になれるのです」

茂林を出るとき、ルリマダラの群れを見かけた。花から花へと舞い移り、最後に山の中に消えていった。微かに紫色の幻光を残し、私たちの目と心の中で永遠に舞い続ける。

X 使用【台灣光華雜誌】APP!
更快速更方便!